YEAR

VIOLENT BEHAVIORS

AUTHOR SOURCE SELECTION ABSTRACT
2008 Does scientific research support regulation of violent television programs? Donna Veraldi PhD
Lorna Veraldi JD
psychology CD
10820
In April 2007 the Federal Communications Commission sent Congress a report urging new regulations of violent content on television. The FCC report claims there is strong evidence that violent content on television produces real-life violence. Does the research show a link between violent television programs and violence in society? A survey of existing research about the effects, if any, of television violence on the behavior of viewers will be provided, and the basis for arguments that research supports government regulation of television content examined.
2008 Effects of Eyeglasses and Race on Juror Decisions Involving a Violent Crime
Michael Brown
Ernesto Henriquez
Jennifer Groscu
Psychology journal 5440 Past research has demonstrated the influence of appearance on legal decision-making at trial. We investigated how defendant race and eyeglass wearing affect juror decisions. We used a 2 (defendant race: African-American versus Caucasian) x 2 (eyeglasses: present versus not present) experimental design. Two hundred and twenty undergraduates were given a vignette and 1 of 4 photographs of the defendant. Participants rendered a verdict and rated the defendant on a number of characteristics. Eyeglasses had an indirect effect on verdict by increasing ratings of intelligence, which decreased guilty verdicts. Overall, eyeglasses did not affect ratings of defendants attractiveness, friendliness, or threateningness. However, there were several significant interaction effects for race of the defendant and the presence of eyeglasses on these ratings.
2008 Sexually violent predator assessment issues Brett Trowbridge PhD, JD|
Jay Adams PhD
Psychology journal 6207 This article discusses problems and issues associated with sexually violent predator (SVP) evaluations. A brief history of sex offender public policy leading up to the passage of SVP legislation is presented, and the common legal elements required for civil commitment by most SVP statutes are delineated. Difficulties in determining the presence of a mental disorder, defining volitional impairment, and predicting future dangerousness are discussed. Controversies surrounding the use of current actuarial instruments and the inclusion of dynamic factors are explored.
2008 Evaluation of the sexually violent predator: psychiatric facts and philosophical fictions
Omar Haroun psychiatry CD 10635 Many forensic psychiatrists are familiar with the controversies surrounding SVP legislation. Up to now, most of the challenges to such legislation have been legal. This lecture will review some new challenges, arising from philosophy, specifically criticizing the law's false understanding of the nature of free will, and whether a mental disorder can "make" a person sexually dangerous.
2008 Does scientific research support regulation of violent television programs? Lorna Veraldi, J.D
Donna Veraldi, Ph.D.
psychology CD 10642 In April 2007 the Federal Communications Commission sent Congress a report urging new regulations of violent content on television. The FCC report claims there is strong evidence that violent content on television produces real-life violence. Does the research show a link between violent television programs and violence in society? A survey of existing research about the effects, if any, of television violence on the behavior of viewers will be provided, and the basis for arguments that research supports government regulation of television content examined.--Donna M. Veraldi, Ph.D. has a private clinical and forensic practice in Billings, Montana. Lorna Veraldi, J.D., is Associate Professor, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Florida International University, Miami.
2008 The participation of psychologists in sexually violent predator evaluations:

Paul Good, Ph.D.
Jules Burstein, Ph.D., Jonathan French, Ph.D.
psychology CD 10662 In this presentation we lay out the rationale for why psychologists should refuse to participate in the SVP civil commitment process. Participants will understand the background of SVP laws, the constitutional problems with them, and the social psychological process of demonizing sex offenders. Participants will appreciate the forensic implications of the vague criteria used to diagnose paraphilias and the DSM's warnings that a psychological diagnosis does not indicate an individual's degree of volitional control. Treatment conundrums in SVP programs will be described so that psychologists are clearly aware of what is going on inside these programs. Psychologists who conduct SVP evaluations for the state should consider the ethics of continuing this practice.--Paul Good, Ph.D. is a clinical and forensic psychologist in private practice in San Francisco, and is Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at UCSF. He has treated and assessed sex offenders for many years. Jules Burstein, Ph.D. is a clinical and forensic psychologist in private practice in Berkeley. He is on the Superior Court Panel of Psychologists in several Bay Area counties, and for 30 years has evaluated and treated sex offenders.
2008 Sexually violent predator assessment issues Brett Trowbridge PhD, JD
Jay Adams PhD
psychology journal 10782 This article discusses problems and issues associated with sexually violent predator (SVP) evaluations. A brief history of sex offender public policy leading up to the passage of SVP legislation is presented, and the common legal elements required for civil commitment by most SVP statutes are delineated. Difficulties in determining the presence of a mental disorder, defining volitional impairment, and predicting future dangerousness are discussed. Controversies surrounding the use of current actuarial instruments and the inclusion of dynamic factors are explored.
2008 The effects of eyeglasses and race on juror decisions involving a violent crime Michael Brown
Ernesto Henriquez
Jennifer Groscup
psychology journal 10784 Past research recent trends in the management of juveniles through juvenile and family courts have brought increased attention to the trial-related abilities of children and adolescents. In the present study, we surveyed 294 low income, urban public school students in grades 5, 7, 9, and 11 to measure their knowledge of court proceedings. Students responses to a group-administered version of the Georgia Court Competence Test revealed that the majority do not possess basic information about court proceedings. Not surprisingly, younger students demonstrated less understanding than older students, but even older students were not able to demonstrate a competent level of understanding using criteria developed in previous studies. The results are discussed in light of emerging studies, and with reference to the challenges that such findings pose for juvenile courts.has demonstrated the influence of appearance on legal decision-making at trial. We investigated how defendant race and eyeglass wearing affect juror decisions. We used a 2 (defendant race: African-American versus Caucasian) x 2 (eyeglasses: present versus not present) experimental design. Two hundred and twenty undergraduates were given a vignette and 1 of 4 photographs of the defendant. Participants rendered a verdict and rated the defendant on a number of characteristics. Eyeglasses had an indirect effect on verdict by increasing ratings of intelligence, which decreased guilty verdicts. Overall, eyeglasses did not affect ratings of defendants attractiveness, friendliness, or threateningness. However, there were several significant interaction effects for race of the defendant and the presence of eyeglasses on these ratings.
2007 Complex PTSD and Violent Antisocial Men: An Overlooked Diagnosis Robert G. Ley, Ph.D. psychology CD 10334 The research is split on the matter of TBI and PTSD, with some authors insisting they cannot co-exist because PTSD requires memory of the event, while others indicate that due to the nature of brain injuries, and the variation in levels of severity, the individual can have a brain injury and PTSD. This paper will discuss the literature, and an example will be given through a case study of a firefighter/pilot who was the sole survivor of a crash, had TBI, and possibly PTSD. Attendees will be able to explain the nature and extent of TBI and PTSD. They will be able to describe their argument in court testimony, and learn how to evaluate and test for these conditions
2007 Sexually Violent Predator Proceedings: Assessment Issues Facing Psychologists Brett Trowbridge
Ph.D.,J.D
Jay Adams, Ph.D
psychology CD
10354 After providing background about SVP proceedings, this presentation will address the legal elements required for a sexually violent commitment. Materials to review, tests to administer, and qualifications of SVP experts will be enumerated. Special emphasis will be given to difficult diagnostic issues for the diagnoses of paraphilias and personality disorder, including problems with diagnostic validity and diagnostic reliability
2007 The Case for a Threshold for Competency in Sexually Violent Predator Civil Commitment Proceedings

Alan Abrams MD, JD
Amy Muth JD,
Nesibe Soysal MD
psychiatry journal 7038 Commitment of the sexually violent predator (SVP) is not only informed by restorative intent but also the desire to protect other members of society from the insidious propensities of the SVP. Thus, remanding an alleged offender to an SVP program constitutes some hybrid of civil ameliorative intervention and criminal containment and, as such, may be construed as quasi-criminal. Toward this end, most SVP laws endeavor to incorporate the preponderance of procedural due process rights accorded to accused individuals within the criminal justice system, except the right to be competent. However, the behaviors of sexually violent predators not infrequently find their origins in psychiatric or neurologic pathology. These same conditions, in fact, often compromise an SVP respondent s mental competence to stand trial. If he is unable to rationally collaborate with his attorney, an accused SVP defendant s fundamental right to counsel, which underpins all procedural due process, is subverted. Furthermore. the outcome of extensive substantive due process rights litigation in civil commitment cases has consistently upheld that those who are involuntarily confined by civil means are entitled to non-punitive conditions of confinement including individualized medically appropriate treatment. However, in the absence of some standard for trial competency, we propound that SVP commitment proceedings fail to fulfill either the procedural due process rights for criminal containment or the substantive due process guarantees for civil commitment.
2007 Violent attacks in psychiatric and other hospitals Ralph Slovenko PhD, JD psychiatry CD 10682 Violent attacks in psychiatric and other hospitals by patients on staff or other patients is increasingly a matter of concern. While the actual number of attacks in hospitals is inex act--there is no national reporting system by which hospitals in general, or psychiatric facilities in particular, must report incidents of violence--it is considered to be extensive. This presentation discusses civil and criminal law remedies with reference to a number of recent cases.--Ralph Slovenko PhD, JD is Professor of Law and Psychiatry at Wayne State University Law School in Detroit Michigan. He is the author of the 2-volume Psy chiatry in Law/Law in Psychiatry 2002).
2006 Ethical issues in the current disposition and treatment of sexually violent predators John Douard PhD, JD, Richard Friedman JD psychiatry journal 7045 After discussing the two broad categories of clinical psychiatric and psychological ethics, i.e., duty-based and utilitarian, the authors apply these analyses to the disposition and treatment of a particular class of individuals, sexually violent predators (SVPs) in the current clinical, legal, and forensic climate. The authors assert that much of the clinical, legal, and forensic activity pertaining to SVPs is pretextual, and based on false premises of clinical science. The authors conclude with a caveat for clinicians practicing in this area. A typical case is discussed.

2006 The incompetent sexually violent predator Alan A Abrams MD, JD
Amy Muth JD
psychiatry tapes 3221 Our legal system distinguishes criminal law from civil law, and criminal commitment from civil commitment. Mental health civil commitment proceedings typically involve a deprivation of liberty based on a concept of illness and dangerousness. However, the liberty interests involved in the civil mental health commitment system and the processes that are due to the individual are not as clearly defined as in the criminal commitment system. A number of states have established Sexually Violent Predators Acts that allow the civil commitment of individuals who have repeatedly committed crimes involving sexual violence or abuse. None explicitly establish a due process right for the proposed committee to be able to assist their attorney in their own defense. The presenters will review the law establishing rights for the mental health civil committee under the due process and equal protection clauses, and discuss the historical purpose of trial competency. The presenters will discuss whether subjecting an otherwise incompetent to stand trial suspected sexually violent predator to a statutory sexually violent predator determination is an acceptable deprivation of liberty rights. They will discuss the constitutional principles established in cases such as Baxstrom v. Herold, Parham v. J.R., and Mathews v. Eldridge, and look at the very few cases addressing the specific question of a right to a competency determination in a state SVP proceeding. Finally, they will examine the difficulties faced by the forensic psychiatrist in participating in the proceedings
2006 The demise of psychology in sexually violent predator commitment trials: smoke and mirrors Robert Halon PhD
Robert Thompson JD
psychology CD 10318 Nowhere are smoke and mirrors so consistently substituted for the methods and information of science of the discipline of psychology, and psychology more abused, than in sexually violent predator commitment trials. This presentation will describe, from the legal and psychological perspectives, the sleights-of-mind that are regularly used in SVP commitment trials in lieu of objective mental health information. How the legal and psychological professions work together in these cases will be described.
2006 The demise of psychology in sexually violent predator commitment trials: smoke and mirrors Robert Halon PhD
Robert Thompson JD
psychology tape 3245 Nowhere are smoke and mirrors so consistently substituted for the methods and information of science of the discipline of psychology, and psychology more abused, than in sexually violent predator commitment trials. This presentation will describe, from the legal and psychological perspectives, the sleights-of-mind that are regularly used in SVP commitment trials in lieu of objective mental health information. How the legal and psychological professions work together in these cases will be described.
2006 Ethical issues in the current disposition and treatment of sexually violent predators John Douard PhD, JD, Richard Friedman JD psychiatry tape 3095 After discussing the two broad categories of clinical psychiatric and psychological ethics, i.e., duty-based and utilitarian, the authors apply these analyses to the disposition and treatment of a particular class of individuals, sexually violent predators (SVPs) in the current clinical, legal, and forensic climate. The authors assert that much of the clinical, legal, and forensic activity pertaining to SVPs is pretextual, and based on false premises of clinical science. The authors conclude with a caveat for clinicians practicing in this area. A typical case is discussed.

2006 The incompetent sexually violent predator Alan A Abrams MD, JD
Amy Muth JD
psychiatry CD 10695 Our legal system distinguishes criminal law from civil law, and criminal commitment from civil commitment. Mental health civil commitment proceedings typically involve a deprivation of liberty based on a concept of illness and dangerousness. However, the liberty interests involved in the civil mental health commitment system and the processes that are due to the individual are not as clearly defined as in the criminal commitment system. A number of states have established Sexually Violent Predators Acts that allow the civil commitment of individuals who have repeatedly committed crimes involving sexual violence or abuse. None explicitly establish a due process right for the proposed committee to be able to assist their attorney in their own defense. The presenters will review the law establishing rights for the mental health civil committee under the due process and equal protection clauses, and discuss the historical purpose of trial competency. The presenters will discuss whether subjecting an otherwise incompetent to stand trial suspected sexually violent predator to a statutory sexually violent predator determination is an acceptable deprivation of liberty rights. They will discuss the constitutional principles established in cases such as Baxstrom v. Herold, Parham v. J.R., and Mathews v. Eldridge, and look at the very few cases addressing the specific question of a right to a competency determination in a state SVP proceeding. Finally, they will examine the difficulties faced by the forensic psychiatrist in participating in the proceedings
2004 The California sexually violent predator (SVP) diagnosis and prediction John Podboy PhD
Albert J Kastl PhD
TD Donaldsonm PhD
psychology tape 3103 The presenters will provide a brief history of psychodiagnosis and discuss issues of validity and reliability in forensic psychology. Particular emphasis will be given to the paraphilias in relation to diagnosis. In California, forensic psychologists make important decisions in regard to sexually violent predators. The reliability and validity of such judgments will be discussed. Participants will learn about current psychodiagnostic instruments in the realm of the paraphilias; they will be able to assess the clinical and forensic utility of these instruments and to understand limitations of current diagnostic procedures, especially in regard to the sexually violent predator classification.
2002 Crime type and specific personality indicia - Cloninger s TCI Impulsivity, empathy and attachment subscales in non-violent and sexual offenders David Nussbaum PhD psychology journal 5418 The present study investigated personality differences in violent, non-violent and sexual offenders incarcerated at a medium security federal penitentiary. The Temperament and Character Inventory was administered to 185 male inmates specifically to obtain, among other data, personality measures of impulsiveness, attachment, and empathy. Criminal records were reviewed and crime type was assigned according to offense history. Age at first offense was also examined. Violent offenders were found to be more impulsive and less empathic than nonviolent offenders. Sexual offenders were found to be less impulsive, more empathic, more attached, and to have a later age of onset than all other offenders. Identifying variables associated with different types of criminal behavior may have important implications for treatment.
2000 Violent risk assessment of the psychotic patient Peter Brown, MD psychiatry tapes 1029 Recent tragedies have focused public attention on seemingly random violence in schools, churches, the workplace and other public settings. However, such events may reinforce stereotypes concerning people with mental illness and may influence public policy disproportionately. This presentation will review the evidence for a link between severe mental illness and violence along the following dimensions: a) delusions, b) hallucinations, c) disorganized speech and behavior, d) comorbidity, and e) insight. These dimensions will be linked to demographic and situational risk factors. Two case presentations of lethal violence involving severely ill individuals will be presented. The greatest risk for violence is still for family members, close acquaintances, and healthcare providers of a small subset of mentally ill patients. Attendees will be able to explain the current literature on violence and psychosis and demonstrate the integration of that knowledge into clinical evaluations
1999 Assessing violent recidivism--issues for forensic psychologists Ralph Underwager PhD
Hollida Wakefield MA
psychology tape 1227 Forensic psychologists have long been asked to make predictions about violence, despite the fact that, in the past, such predictions by clinicians have been notoriously inaccurate. Several states now have sexual predator laws which require predictions to be made concerning the likelihood of recidivism. Since the U.S. Supreme Court in Kansas v. Hendricks (1997) upheld Kansas s sexual predator law, such requests are likely to increase in the future. Fortunately, there is now ongoing empirical research which has improved psychologists ability to predict violence in high risk groups. Participants will understand the theoretical issues involved in the prediction of violence, the impact of the sexual predator laws and will gain familiarity with the current research concerning predicting violent recidivism.
1999 The sexually violent predator- psychiatric and legal issues (2 tapes) John T. Philipsborn, JD
psychiatry tapes 1212 This presentation is based on a "sexually violent predator" statute. The speaker addresses current developments in the law, professional ethics involved in testimony relating to psychiatric diagnoses and current research and literature on predictions of future dangerousness by psychiatrists.
1999 Psychosis in violent crime R.J. Brown, Ph.D. psychiatry tapes 1129 no abstract at this time
1998 Personality profile comparison of intimate and stranger violent convicts Marc Nesca PhD psychology journal 1110 This study was designed to investigate personality differences between two groups of federal inmates: One group (group IA) was composed of individuals incarcerated for assaulting an intimate, the other (group SA) was composed of individuals incarcerated for assaulting a stranger. A control group (group CO) composed of nonviolent offenders was also included. Potential participants were identified by reviewing all inmate files at a Canadian federal penitentiary. Ultimately 119 male inmates participated and contributed a mix of archival and directly collected data regarding basic personality processes, interpersonal style, and criminal history. The resulting pattern of data revealed that intimate-violent subjects were more depressed and reported a higher number of suicide attempts than stranger-violent subjects. Aside from these differences, the target groups produced very similar profiles, with most differences emerging in comparison to the control group. These results are discussed with reference to the extant literature and the need to explore alternative research paradigms.
1998 Differences between violent female and male offenders-an explanatory study Joan deSousz PhD psychology journal 1198 This study was designed to identify the different predictors of criminal violence in female and male offenders. The study investigated the relative contribution of the independent variables: family criminality, history of prior convictions, physical and sexual abuse, and MMPI clinical scales to the dependent variable: criminal violence. Criminal violence was defined by the original charge at the time of arrest. A separate regression analysis was performed on assaultive female and male offenders. The results of the regression analysis for assaultive female and male offenders were compared. The results of the hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that a negative criminal history and Hysteria, as measured by the MMPI, were significant contributors to hierarchical regression model on female violence. Family criminality, Hypomania, Depression and Paranoia as measured by the MMPI were significant for assaultive male offenders. Hypomania and Depression as measured by the MMPI were negatively related to the dependent variable in males
1998 Psychotic symptom patterns among violent offenders Richard Yarvis MD psychiatry journal 8069 no abstract
1997 Differences between female and male violent offenders-a study Joan de Souza PhD psychology tape 10121 A study designed to identify the different predictors of criminal violence among female and male offenders will be discussed. Results showed that a negative criminal history and hysteria, as measured by the MMPI, were significant contributors to the hierarchical regression model on female violence. Family criminality, hypomania, depression, and paranoia, as measured by the MMPI, were significant for assaultive male offenders. Participants will gain an understanding of the importance of interaction between environmental and personality factors in explaining aggression in general, and female violence in particular.
1997 Assessment, competency, and disposition of the mildly retarded violent offender Michael Cleary MD psychiatry tapes 1292 Psychiatric evaluation of the offender in a criminal proceeding includes a survey of background, education, intelligence, legal issues, life experiences, circumstances of the charged event and degree of violence involved. Defendants who are mentally retarded present specific problems. Participants will learn to distinguish between special needs and aspects of mentally retarded versus mentally disordered offenders and increase skills in making evaluations of the mildly mentally retarded offender.
1997 Impulsivity and violent offending David Nussbaum PhD psychology journal 11 Impulsivity often appears within a constellation of behaviors deemed problematic by forensic and other mental health professionals and associated with violent offending. Recent research has suggested that forensic psychiatric inpatients scoring high on impulsivity tend to score low on measures of verbal intelligence.
1997 Understanding violent juvenile offenders Arthur Eisenbuch PhD psychology journal 8063 The emergence of this acute contemporary focus can best be understood as a ground-swell response to the numerous, large-scale longitudinal studies, which have presented compelling evidence that the vast majority of serious juvenile crime (armed robbery, assault, rape and homicide) are committed each year by a relatively small group of hard core juvenile offenders; totaling only about 10-15 percent of all juvenile offenders.
1997 Understanding violent juvenile offenders Arthur Eisenbuch PhD psychology tape 9095 The emergence of this acute contemporary focus can best be understood as a ground-swell response to the numerous, large-scale longitudinal studies, which have presented compelling evidence that the vast majority of serious juvenile crime (armed robbery, assault, rape and homicide) are committed each year by a relatively small group of hard core juvenile offenders; totaling only about 10-15 percent of all juvenile offenders.
1997 Impulsivity and violent offending David Nussbaum PhD psychology tape 1265 Impulsivity often appears within a constellation of behaviors deemed problematic by forensic and other mental health professionals and associated with violent offending. Recent research has suggested that forensic psychiatric inpatients scoring high on impulsivity tend to score low on measures of verbal intelligence.
1996 Synergistic effect of the delusions of jealousy and erotomania in violent behavior J Arturo Silva MD psychiatry journal 461 Delusional systems are often composed of several delusions of different content. Each of these delusions may have a different cause and time course and may also cause the deluded individual to experience other symptoms or exhibit specific behaviors. Conceptualizing delusional systems as multidelusion processes is important in forensic psychiatry because different delusions may have independent as well as overlapping contributing effects in the genesis of aggression. In this article we present the case of a man who experienced a prominent delusion of jealousy as well as an erotomanic delusion. We will analyze the role that these delusions as well as other symptoms played in causing the affected individual to become violent.
1996 Violent crime in psychiatric patients-relationship to frontal lobe impairment Menahem Krakowski MD
psychiatry journal 9022 This study found an association between violent crime in the community and impairment on neuropsychological tasks, specifically the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and psychomotor tasks.

1996 Standardized tests and violent behavior Maurice Ohayon MD psychiatry tapes 10001 no abstract at this time
1996 Synergistic effect of the delusions of jealousy and erotomania in violent behavior J Arturo Silva MD psychiatry journal 6000 Delusional systems are often composed of several delusions of different content. Each of these delusions may have a different cause and time course and may also cause the deluded individual to experience other symptoms or exhibit specific behaviors. Conceptualizing delusional systems as multidelusion processes is important in forensic psychiatry because different delusions may have independent as well as overlapping contributing effects in the genesis of aggression. In this article we present the case of a man who experienced a prominent delusion of jealousy as well as an erotomanic delusion. We will analyze the role that these delusions as well as other symptoms played in causing the affected individual to become violent.
1992 Abandonment adult rage-the root of violent criminal acts Faith Leibman MA, JD psychology journal 359 This article explores the underlying dynamics of acts of violence and the development and implementation of treatment programs for violent offenders. Acts of violence seldom occur in a vacuum.




1992 Childhood abandonment/adult rage-the root of violent criminal acts Faith Leibman JD psychology journal 8151 no abstract
1990 Violent sex offenders-study of 450 offenders Joseph A Noone MD psychiatry tapes 1713 450 evaluations of litigants for the purpose of assessing the degree of risk offenders may present to the community upon release were performed. Focus is on sexual and violent offenders. Dangerousness, recidivism, community offender programs and DSD personality disorders explored.
1990 Organic brain disorders and violent behavior John Dupre MD psychiatry journal 6053 Traditional psychiatric evaluations have been grossly inadequate in diagnosing organic neurological factors involved in criminal behavior of a violent nature. These factors can be adequately elicited only by a diagnostic team, which includes a psychiatrist, neurologist, neuropsychologist, electroencephalographer and neuroradiologist. Diagnostic investigations should be undertaken at the time of the judicial proceedings and prior to sentencing as they constitute mitigating factors when present.
1990 Background variables in murderers, violent and nonviolent felons Emil Pinta MD
Robert Fine MD
Paul Bessimer BA
Paul Bessimer B A
psychiatry journal 6206 This study illustrates the difficulty in predicting murder from an examination of psychosocial background variables. A history of violence and a background of parental brutality during childhood suggests further violence, but not murder.
1990 Background variables in murderers, violent and nonviolent felons Emil Pinta MA and Robert Fine MD psychology journal 8143 no abstract
1988 Violent homicide in two patients with movement disorders LD King MD psychiatry tapes 1491 Two adolescent males who committed violent homicide are viewed from medical, neurological, psychiatric, psychological and familial social perspectives. Both males exhibit facial tics and one exhibits abnormal vocalizations. The possible relationship to Tourette's Disorder to potential for violence is discussed.
1988 Predictor variables of violent behavior Steven Norton MA psychology journal 5244 The prediction of violence is a major problem for the mental health system. The basis for violence prediction has traditionally involved individual judgments, psychiatric diagnoses or a history of violent acts, while ignoring learning history, environmental and situational variables. This study attempted to define learning history, environmental and situational variables related to the occurrence of a violent act. The case histories of 202 violent and nonviolent males committed to the Rusk State Hospital in Rusk, Texas were reviewed to find this data.
1986 Violent psychiatric inpatients Daniel Davis PhD and Lucinda Boster MA psychology journal 6027 Authors present a wide-ranging review of research based characteristics of the violent psychiatric patient psychiatric diagnosis itself being one of the least helpful predictors (with the exception of seizure disorder), concluding that the best single predictor of violence is a history of violence. By applying social learning, cognitive appraisal, and stress inoculation models, authors suggest a number of specific therapeutic interventions which hold considerable promise.

1984 Impact of biological psychiatry in prediction of violent behavior Ali Si, MD psychiatry tapes 1735 A view of the phenomenon of violence in the perspective of biological psychiatry. Included are particular reasons why an act of violence is committed. Discussion of the impact of recent advances and theories to establish better guidelines for prediction of violence.
1983 Psychiatric diagnosis and pattern of drug abuse among violent adolescent criminals Anassero; Daniel MD psychiatry journal 5104 151 severely violent adolescent offenders admitted to a maximum security placement for psychiatric appraisal were studied. Findings support view that violent adolescents are not a homogenous entity diagnostically but evidence multiple disorders. Depression and Substance Abuse disorders should not be underestimated.
1983 The psychologist and potentially violent patient- guidelines in professional practice David Shapiro PhD psychology journal 6072 Survey of recent court decisions tends to heighten the anxiety level of most psychotherapists. A closer reading of them, judicious use of signed treatment contracts, and careful progress notes, in private practice or in institutions would reduce the anxiety of the mental health professional who treats potentially dangerous patients.