YEAR

PTSD

AUTHOR SOURCE SELECTION ABSTRACT
2009 PTSD or not? Iatrogenically-induced PTSD Keyhill Sheorm MD Psychiatry CD 10456 With more prominent visibility of posttraumatic stress disorder, patients with medical problems are being referred to psychiatrists to be evaluated for the trauma of their illness. Some physicians are diagnosing PTSD and are treat-ing this illness. The cycle gets reinforced by workers compensation or legal claims and the patient is underserved. Attendees will understand 1) the typical differential diagnoses that tend to be referred from general practitioners to psychiatrists; 2) the slippery slope of diagnosing PTSD and the gratification that provides for all parties; 3) how to treat the psychological consequences of the presenting medical complaint without introducing an unnecessary diagno-sis. Keyhill Sheorn has been in solo practice for 20 years, specializing in the long-term treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder.
2009 Forensic aspects of PTSD Matthew Carroll MD psychiatry CD 10457 There are suggestions of a new epidemic of PTSD, but it is unclear if this is a true or false finding. The changing epidemiology of PTSD may be affected by factors such as new stressors (from new wars), changing diagnostic criteria (definition of qualifying stressors), new motivations to have PTSD (benefits), desire for psychiatric excuses to reduce blame or culpability (my PTSD made me do it). In some situations individuals may be motivated in the opposite direction, to avoid the diagnosis of PTSD, since the diagnosis may hinder promotions in military and civilian employment. The forensic psychiatrist is increasingly being asked to form clinical and forensic opinions and to address the above issues. Attendees will understand the prevalence of PTSD, the controversial issues around PTSD, and what factors affect the diagnosis. Attendees will be able to explain how PTSD affects criminal issues, and how it is used in civil litigation. Matthew Carroll, M.D. is a psychiatrist who served 12 years in the United States Navy, and has inter-viewed numerous active duty and retired military members. He has worked for the Veterans Administration for 6 years, providing PTSD evaluations.
2009 Posttraumatic stress disoder-how to provide comprehensive forensic assessment Douglas Johnson PhD psychology CD 10576 Several challenges exist to forensic assessment of PTSD. What constitutes a trauma, as well as the subjective nature of DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criterion A2, make assessment of PTSD uniquely difficult. Further complicating accurate assessment are the pervasive use of symptom checklists, symptom overlap with other anxiety disorders, depression, and TBI, and the widespread omission of differential diagnosis for malingering. This presentation will examine the nature of these challenges to assessment, and outline some specific methods for improving precision and thoroughness in forensic evaluation of PTSD. Attendees will be able to 1) identify DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria that create challenges to forensic assessment of PTSD; 2) enumerate approaches to assessment that can resolve or minimize challenges to forensic assessment of PTSD. Douglas Christian Johnson, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in Psychiatry at UCSD and serves as Head of Research Facilitation at the Navy Center for Combat Operational Stress Control, Naval Medical Center San Diego.
2008
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in combat veterans-clinical and legal perspectives Eric Fine MD
Lawrence Levin JD
Psychiatry journal 5286 Recent statistical data regarding the incidence of PTSD and other psychiatric symptomatology in servicemen and women deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq since 2001 are discussed. The frequent presence of these disorders is a matter of great concern so far as providing treatment to these veterans, and results of the various treatment modalities provided are described. As well as clinical implications, the legal ramifications for assessment of PTSD and assignment of service-related compensation are emphasized.
2008 Epidemiological observation of the evolution of PTSD in the American general population Maurice Ohayon MD

The causes of PTSD have been documented over the years. Most of the studies have placed emphasis on the most dramatic events such as violent crimes, natural catastrophes and war. However, from our epidemiological data, it appears that a significant number of cases of PTSD are developed without direct contact with the traumatic event. In this presentation the main differences between these two types of PTSD will be presented in terms of depression, anxiety and cognitive impairment. Legal issues will be discussed
2008 PTSD and TBI-mutually exclusive or two sides of the same coin? Christian Johnson D
10771 Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) has been the signature casualty of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. The dramatic increase in prevalence of head trauma has brought additional attention to the relationship between TBI and PTSD. Because TBI commonly results in loss of consciousness, some have indicated that TBI and PTSD cannot coexist. This clinical argument is predicated on the notion that human learning mechanisms are unimodal, and that encoding of memories requires awareness. This talk will present recent findings from PTSD and TBI research, drawing largely from neuropsychological and clinical studies that highlight the importance of understanding how PTSD is actually acquired, and the implications of this type of acquisition for forensic evaluations and treatment. Attendees will be able to enumerate PTSD and TBI nosology; describe the role of fear conditioning in PTSD; explain why memory encoding during trauma allows for PTSD and TBI to coexist; identify importance of PTSD diagnostic tools for application in forensic settings
2008 Posttraumatic stress disorder in combat veterans Eric W. Fine, M.D.
Lawrence D. Levin, J.D.
psychiatry CD 10609 The incidence and criteria for the diagnosis of PTSD in combat veterans will be discussed. Treatment options are described that include the use of psychoactive medications and appropriate psychotherapy. The difficulty in treating these disorders is exemplified by a veteran from WWII and another from the Vietnam war who were evaluated by the author and found to have significant residual signs and symptoms of PTSD despite treatment. The current state of VA law pertinent to PTSD will be discussed with regard to Global Assessment of Functioning that is emphasized by the VA as being a critical factor in determining levels of disability. Attendees will become familiar with PTSD in veterans and the legal implications, and prepared for a new influx of veterans of the Iraq war with PTSD.--Eric W. Fine, M.D. is in the private practice of clinical and forensic psychiatry in Philadelphia, PA. He is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Jefferson Medical College. Lawrence D. Levin, J.D. is an attorney at law in Jenkintown, PA.
2008 Epidemiological observation of the evolution of ptsd in the American general population Maurice M. Ohayon, M.D., D.Sc., Ph.D. psychiatry CD 10639 Maurice M. Ohayon, M.D., D.Sc., Ph.D.
The causes of PTSD have been documented over the years. Most of the studies have placed emphasis on the most dramatic events such as violent crimes, natural catastrophes and war. However, from our epidemiological data, it appears that a significant number of cases of PTSD are developed without direct contact with the traumatic event. In this presentation the main differences between these two types of PTSD will be presented in terms of depression, anxiety and cognitive impairment. Legal issues will be discussed.--Dr. Maurice Ohayon is Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and is Director of the Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center.
2008 PTSD and TBI: mutually exclusive or two sides of the same coin? Douglas Christian Johnson, Ph.D. psychology CD 10654 Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) has been the signature casualty of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. The dramatic increase in prevalence of head trauma has brought additional attention to the relationship between TBI and PTSD. Because TBI commonly results in loss of consciousness, some have indicated that TBI and PTSD cannot coexist. This clinical argument is predicated on the notion that human learning mechanisms are unimodal, and that encoding of memories requires awareness. This talk will present recent findings from PTSD and TBI research, drawing largely from neuropsychological and clinical studies that highlight the importance of understanding how PTSD is actually acquired, and the implications of this type of acquisition for forensic evaluations and treatment. Attendees will be able to enumerate PTSD and TBI nosology; describe the role of fear conditioning in PTSD; explain why memory encoding during trauma allows for PTSD and TBI to coexist; identify importance of PTSD diagnostic tools for application in forensic settings.--Douglas Christian Johnson, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at UCSD and the San Diego VA Healthcare System. From 2005-2007 he was on faculty at Yale School of Medicine, conducting on psychological resilience at the National Center for PTSD, Clinical Neurosciences Division in West Haven, CT.
2007 Traumatic brain injury and PTSD: Can they co-exist? Allan R Gerson PhD psychology CD 10333 The research is split on the matter of TBI and PTSD, with some authors insisting they cannot coexist because PTSD requires memory of the event, while others indicate that due to the nature of brain injuries, and the variation in levels of severity, the individual can have a brain injury and PTSD. This paper will discuss the literature, and an example will be given through a case study of a firefighter/pilot who was the sole survivor of a crash, had TBI, and possibly PTSD. Attendees will be able to explain the nature and extent of TBI and PTSD. They will be able to describe their argument in court testimony, and learn how to evaluate and test for these conditions.
2007 Complex PTSD and Violent Antisocial Men: An Overlooked Diagnosis Robert G. Ley, Ph.D. psychology CD 10334 The research is split on the matter of TBI and PTSD, with some authors insisting they cannot co-exist because PTSD requires memory of the event, while others indicate that due to the nature of brain injuries, and the variation in levels of severity, the individual can have a brain injury and PTSD. This paper will discuss the literature, and an example will be given through a case study of a firefighter/pilot who was the sole survivor of a crash, had TBI, and possibly PTSD. Attendees will be able to explain the nature and extent of TBI and PTSD. They will be able to describe their argument in court testimony, and learn how to evaluate and test for these conditions
2007 Neuropsychological effects of Complex PTSD Marc Zimmermann, Ph.D psychology CD 10335 Individuals who have experienced childhood traumas, particularly multiple or repeated traumas, have been found to display deficits in neuropsychological functioning. These deficits may be in information processing, cognitive organization, memory or impulse control. This presentation will describe these deficits and discuss how they can contribute to violent or aggressive behavior. Case examples will be presented, with discussion of how neuropsychological difficulties were factors in the development of violent offenses
2006 Posttraumatic stress disorder: trends in diagnosis and treatment Albert Kastl PhD
John Podboy PhD
psychology tape 3240 The Institute for Creative Technologies at the University of Southern California has recently used a video game, originally developed as an Army combat training tool, to assist in treatment of soldiers suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This new technology may be effective in PTSD treatment to alleviate painful memories and fear, and to manage the anxiety itself. Perhaps this methodology could be effective in diagnosis as well. It also could re-traumatize certain patients. In addition to discussion of this topic, cases of civilian claims of posttraumatic stress disorder will be reviewed. By reviewing case studies, participants will receive suggestions for evaluating the depth and authenticity of posttraumatic stress disorder in forensic contexts.
2006 Relationship between adult delinquency, childhood victimization, drug abuse and PTSD in a prison population Dr Illi Goldberg psychiatry tapes 10227
2006 Posttraumatic stress disorder: trends in diagnosis and treatment Albert Kastl PhD
John Podboy PhD
psychology CD 10714 The Institute for Creative Technologies at the University of Southern California has recently used a video game, originally developed as an Army combat training tool, to assist in treatment of soldiers suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This new technology may be effective in PTSD treatment to alleviate painful memories and fear, and to manage the anxiety itself. Perhaps this methodology could be effective in diagnosis as well. It also could re-traumatize certain patients. In addition to discussion of this topic, cases of civilian claims of posttraumatic stress disorder will be reviewed. By reviewing case studies, participants will receive suggestions for evaluating the depth and authenticity of posttraumatic stress disorder in forensic contexts.
2005 The watering down of PTSD in criminal law Ralph Slovenko JD, PhD psychiatry tapes 3149 There is nothing new about the phenomenon of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) but there have been developments in its diagnosis and treatment and its role in litigation. These will be viewed from the perspective of an attorney.
2005 Perverse advice in the treatment of PTSD in litigants and claimants F Wayne Furlong MD psychiatry tapes 3152 PTSD is widely diagnosed in both the no fault automobile system and other tort actions in Ontario. In Ontario psychologists are involved particularly in the no fault system, in provision of both disability reports and treatment, usually involving the same person. Most persons, even after a genuinely traumatic event, do not develop PTSD. Despite the occurrence of disabling PTSD, generally the natural course of PTSD, even without treatment, is to improvement. This does not appear to be as widely known as it should be. This is not so surprising however, as PTSD is an anxiety disorder. There are effective treatments including particularly various medications, and several forms of behavioral and exposure therapy. These established points are often ignored when a negative prognosis is given without mentioning treatment. It is not uncommon for Ontario psychologists and some psychiatrists to tell clients/claimants unhelpful things about prognosis and treatment. A number of examples will illustrate this in detail. The participant will have a richer understanding of what may be uncovered, and about what one may explore in this area and how this can influence claims and the litigation process as well as treatment outcome. Imparted misinformation can affect both the response to treatment (really at times pseudo treatment) and the litigation process. Such details as retained by litigants/claimants can truly astound if sought for.
2005 Posttraumatic silencing: how the aftermath of trauma, PTSD and incarceration impede psychologist-defendant and attorney-defendant communications
Francis Abueg PhD psychology tape 3191 A relatively new and poorly understood construct discussed in the literature on trauma and posttrauamtic stress disorder (PTSD) is traumatic silencing. This notion represents patient-defendants (or litigants) who have specifically survived trauma, who tend to withhold or conceal information, often to their detriment in legal proceedings. Two case vignettes taken from recent death penalty trials will be discussed in detail and suggestions made for how forensic consultants can assist attorneys in interviewing strategies. Attendees will be able to define traumatic silencing; identify what aspects of PTSD, incarceration and prison culture contribute to silencing; understand what social, cultural and intrapersonal factors exacerbate silencing; discuss ways of helping attorneys in developing trust and mitigating barriers to disclosure.
2005 The abuse excuse - developments in the role of PTSD litigation


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Ralph Slovenko PhD, JD psychiatry journal 7072 Excuses have always been part and parcel of the human vocabulary. In Genesis, Eve blamed the serpent for eating from the tree of knowledge. That morphed into the Devil made me do it. Otherwise put, I didn t mean to do it. I couldn t help it.
2005 Strategies for the assessment of pseudo or malingered posttraumatic stress disorder Linda Gummow PhD
Rob Conger PhD
psychology tape 3170 no abstract at this time
2003 Posttraumatic stress dishonesty (2 tapes) James J. McDonald, Jr. psychology tape 3048 PTSD diagnoses are commonly found in personal injury litigation. While some of these diagnoses are plainly valid, others are more dubious. This presentation will examine the diagnostic criteria for PTSD set forth in DSM-IV-TR and explore how some expert witnesses and courts have departed from these criteria in favor of idiosyncratic definitions of PTSD designed to fit a particular case but which do not stand up to scientific scrutiny.
2003 Service-connected disability compensation for posttraumatic stress disorder and other mental disabilities

Eric Fine MD
Lawrence Levin JD

psychiatry journal 7077 no abstract
2002 Faking PTSD from a motor vehicle accident on the MMPI-2 Daine Moyer PhD psychology journal 8191 The MMPI-2 is often used to assess posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in individuals who claim psychological injury as a result of a motor vehicle accident. There is concern that attorneys can coach plaintiffs to fake PTSD.
2001 PTSD, trial and testimony (2 tapes) Joyce Vesper PhD
psychology tape 9027 no abstract at this time
2001 PTSD, trial and testimony (2 tapes) Joyce Vesper PhD
psychology tape 9028
2000 Mock trial-expert testimony, civil case, police shooting, PTSD (1 of 3) David Glaser MD psychiatry tapes 1112 This is a civil case focusing on the PTSD diagnosis of a 30 year-old man shot by a police officer. The psychiatrist engaged by the defense denied PTSD and instead diagnosed intermittent explosive disorder, personality disorder and gunshot wound to abdomen, medically resolved. The trial will focus on the testimony, direct and cross-examination of the psychiatrists as expert witnesses in court.
2000 Liability for PTSD-related violence Donna Veraldi PhD
Lorna Veraldi JD
psychology journal 876 Violent behavior often is predicted by exposure to stressors capable of producing PTSD. Violent reactions by those with PTSD may be triggered by media content ranging from scenes of violence to seemingly neutral cues like color. Should media companies be held responsible for the violent acts of individuals with PTSD whose actions are triggered by media content? Both the First Amendment and traditional concepts of liability, including foreseeability of harm, argue against liability for media content that may trigger PTSD related violence. However, there are sound policy reasons to extend liability for future PTSD related violence to those responsible for the stressors that produce PTSD in the first place particularly if such potential liability serves as an incentive to provide resources for treatment to mitigate the effects of a traumatic incident and reduce the possibility of future violence.
2000 Mock trial-expert testimony, civil case, police shooting, PTSD (3 tapes) David Glaser MD psychiatry tapes 1113 Mock trial
2000 Evaluating and preparing the PTSD claim; lawyer's perspective Joyce Vesper PhD
psychology tape 1015 This presentation explores how lawyers evaluate a claim of posttraumatic stress disorder, and then prepare and present the case in litigation. Since attorneys representing the interests of plaintiffs and defendants approach these kinds of claims very differently, it will distinguish and analyze these claims from their unique perspectives. The role the psychologist plays in the evaluating and preparation processes, both from the standpoint of the treating psychologist working with the claimant and the forensic psychologist working with the lawyer in developing and presenting the claim, will be explored. Psychology


1999 Role of the expert witness in cases involving PTSD CB Scrignar MD psychiatry tapes 1219 Preparation, effective communication, and presentation comprise the essential ingredients of an expert witness during depositions and testimony in court. Courtroom examples from the presenter s 30 years of experience as an expert witness illustrate effective testimony involving both PTSD and malingering. This presentation will demonstrate that an expert opinion represents the best possible explanation of the relationship between the trauma and the plaintiff s current mental state based on a reasonable medical probability.

1999 Litigating posttraumatic stress disorder- effects on the family Joyce Vesper PhD
psychology tape 1230 PTSD is a unique psychological injury, since the diagnosis conveys the message that the event or environment creating the disorder was severely damaging or life threatening. Legally, the term implies that the injury is proximately related to the damaging situation or environment. Experts disagree on the accuracy of the diagnosis, treatment methodology, and etiology. Both the client and the family of the client get caught in the professional dispute and the conflict between the litigators, resulting in extended court involvement, cost, and emotional upheaval. Participants will be able to identify three problems the client family experiences as a result of PTSD litigation and three ways the forensic psychologist can lessen the emotional impact of the evaluation and assessment; and will be able to list two problems that litigation can cause for the family of the PTSD claimant.
1999 Who is liable for PTSD triggered violence? third party liability cases Donna Veraldi PhD and Lorna Veraldi JD psychology tape 1229 Who should be responsible for injuries by individuals who claim that their actions are driven by trauma triggered by third party actions? For instance, should media be liable for violence triggered by media content? What about stressful or traumatic events that trigger preexisting PTSD? What about responsibility for criminal actions? Who have the courts held liable in cases where PTSD triggers are argued? Participants will learn about prior court decisions in cases seeking third party liability against defendants and current research concerning potential violent responses to trauma triggers.
1999 Pitfalls in forensic PTSD evaluations James W Schutte PhD psychology tape 1181 Posttraumatic stress disorder diagnoses are commonly seen in cases of civil litigation. Once limited to clearly traumatic experiences such as airline crashes or sexual assaults, PTSD is now being claimed in more dubious arenas, such as minor traffic accidents, wrongful arrests, slip and fall cases and sexual harassment litigation. Idiosyncratic diagnostic criteria, failure to take a complete history and ignoring the possibility of malingering are problems which plague hasty PTSD diagnoses. It is important for the evaluating psychologist in PTSD cases to be aware of issues of adherence to the DSM-IV criteria, consideration of base rates, pre morbid history, differential diagnosis, and malingering.
1999 The traumatic principle and PTSD-stressor criteria CB Scrignar MD psychiatry tapes 1220 The stressor event for PTSD is critically analyzed. The following questions, with clinical illustrations, form the basis of this presentation: Can an uninvited, sexually explicit remark cause PTSD? Can PTSD develop upon learning about the death of a friend or loved one in an airplane crash? If an individual develops cancer or has a heart attack, can PTSD develop? The Traumatic Principle clarifies these issues and assures a more complete analysis of the stressor criteria for PTSD. The presenter will analyze the stressor criteria for PTSD with the intent of making more precise and objective the environmental events which can precipitate PTSD.
1999 Defense and PTSD - representing or confronting in court CB Scrignar MD psychiatry tapes 1173 The approach of the defense toward effective confrontation of a PTSD claim is critically analyzed. Cases involving employer and sexual harassment and rape, wrongful termination of employment, misdiagnosis, and the concept of malingering are illustrated with case histories from the speaker s experience. The plaintiff s view and the defense challenges are illustrated with the "Ten Defense Challenges to PTSD." Participants will be able to effectively present PTSD in court and/or confront the diagnosis of PTSD during direct and cross-examination.


1998 Dangerous misidentification of people associated with PTSD J Arturo Silva MD psychiatry journal 1216 Misidentification of persons may occur in the context of a psychotic process, dissociative states, and in those who do not suffer from psychopathology. In this article we present two cases of posttraumatic stress disorder, one of a man who suffered from traumatic nightmares, and another who suffered from flashback phenomena. In both cases the posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms were associated with episodes of violence. The relation between misidentification and flashbacks or nightmares due to combat exposure and their subsequent association with violence is explored.
1998 Mismanagement of countertransference in PTSD: ethical and legal violations
Joyce Vesper PhD psychiatry journal 873 Therapists working with traumatized people are confronted with intense emotions and bizarre stories that challenge reality and reach into the most sinister side of humanity. Attachment problems, control issues, and dominance dilemmas surface during the course of therapy. Clients pressure therapists to reenact the trauma or divert the memories rather than remember and purge the horrors from their minds. The insistence that the therapist relive or distract the traumatic event(s) challenges treatment methodology, frustrates therapists, and creates opportunities for dual relationships, ethical violations, and malpractice offenses. In order to avoid these pitfalls, the therapist must have a sound grasp of trauma-based psychotherapeutic techniques, knowledge of trauma theory, and a healthy understanding of the treatment role within the therapeutic relationship.
1998 Victimization and development of PTSD Maurice Ohayon MD psychiatry tapes 1209 Posttraumatic stress disorder is an anxiety disorder that was first identified in Second World War veterans. However, this disorder can be developed in situations where an individual is exposed to an extreme situation such as being a victim or witness of an aggression. We assessed the prevalence of this disorder in a sample of 1832 subjects representative of the general population of Toronto, Canada. Aggressive traumatic events (such as physical aggression, rape, robbery) were compared to other traumatic events in terms of daily repercussions and subsequent development of other disorders. At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to recognize manifestations of posttraumatic stress disorder and know the risks associated with the experience of traumatic events.


1998 History of the M Naghten insanity defense and the use of posttraumatic stress disorder as a basis of insanity Arthur Garrison psychology journal 2225 Debate over the existence of an insanity defense and the legal assessment of when a person should not be punished for a criminal act due to mental illness has been an issue in the law for more than 200 years. From 1724 and the development of the "wild beast" test to the M Naghten test of right and wrong to the "irresistible impulse" test to the Durham "products test" the law has struggled with the question of what mental state will release a person from criminal liability. Should the cognitive mind alone govern the issue or should the other aspect of human behavior, including volitional and emotional states, influence the culpability of the offender? The purpose of this article is to review the history of the development of the definition of the insanity defense. The key cases and legal arguments from English and American law will be reviewed to show how the theory as well as the definition of insanity developed. The article will also discuss how posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can form the basis of an insanity defense and will review federal, military and state cases in which PTSD was used as a basis for a claim of insanity.
1998 Posttraumatic stress disorder-an overview Maurice Ohayon MD, DSc, PhD psychiatry journal 8068 no abstract
1998 Mismanagement of counertransference in PTSD-ethical and legal violations Joyce Vesper PhD psychology journal 8174 no abstract
1997 Countertransference and malpractice violations in the management of PTSD Joyce Vesper PhD
psychology tape 10136 Therapists working with traumatized people are confronted with intense emotions and bizarre stories that challenge reality and reach into the darkest side of humanity. Clients pressure therapists to reenact the trauma rather than remember and purge it from their memory. Insistence that the therapist relive the traumatic event(s) challenges treatment methodology, frustrates therapists, and creates the opportunities for dual relationships and malpractice. Presenter discusses attachment problems, dominance issues and presents at least two methods by which to avoid malpractice violations.
1997 Post-traumatic stress disorder - negative consequences of the diagnosis Daniel Creson, MD, PhD
Patricia Blakeney PhD
psychiatry tapes 1296 Psychological, social and interpersonal consequences of PTSD diagnosis and potential for an increase in client morbidity following diagnosis will be discussed. Use of the term "disorder" predisposes client, lawyer and mental health professional to assumptions that often result in chronicity of symptoms and morbidity. The presenter's clinical experience and work in Croatia and Bosnia will be used to illustrate this premise. Ethical responsibilities will also be discussed. Participants will learn to identify consequences of diagnosing PTSD; to work with clients in ways to diminish negative consequences of the diagnosis; and to maintain an ethical perspective when dealing with PTSD diagnosed clients.
1997 Prevalence of PTSD among victimized clinicians in psychiatric and correctional settings Richard Lusignan PhD psychiatry journal 1223 In our study we used a self-administered questionnaire based on the DSM definition of PTSD and a victimization survey with a sample of clinicians working in correctional or forensic settings (N=180). Our results indicate that during the course of their lives 53 percent (95/180) of our respondents experienced a stressing event associated with PTSD.
These findings raise questions as to the pursuit of clinical activities with violent clients after a personal incident of victimization. The type of practice, the presence of peers or of a supervisor, and the individual s ability to monitor himself can all play a role during the aftermath of victimization.
1997 Global Amnesia, PTSD, Malingering, Incompetence-sorting them out for the court Michael Cleary MD psychiatry journal 8065 no abstract
1997 Global Amnesia, PTSD, Malingering, Incompetence-sorting them out for the court Michael Cleary MD psychiatry tape 1329 no abstract
1995 Violence in the workplace and PTSD Bruce Danto MD psychiatry tape 1349 no abstract
1992 Assessing PTSD in personal injury cases Donna Veraldi PhD psychology tape 1915 A comprehensive discussion of the nature of PTSD and its symptoms is presented. PTSD may present in idiosyncractic forms but is distinguished by a chronic state of arousal that is both emotional and physiological in nature. Use of a battery of tests to validate a PTSD pattern is recommended.
1992 Biological marker in claimed posttrauamatic stress disorder FW Furlong MD psychiatry journal 5055 Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder which may occur after catastrophic events. It may be claimed as a compensable consequence of a variety of circumstances. The features are difficult to distinguish from other anxiety disorders and diagnostic considerations, the diagnosis is made largely on history, and the criteria are relatively well circulated. Physiological responses, particularly pulse changes to taped battle sounds, have been noted as very diagnostic in combat veterans. The measurement of pulse change to taped traffic and car sounds taken in conjunction with other observations and a careful history about such responses is useful in a thorough medicolegal assessment of claimed PTSD following vehicle accidents. Several years ago I constructed a tape recording consisting of various traffic sounds. This has been modified in various ways over time but now consists of a sequence of horns, brakes screeching, crash sounds and sirens. This has been used in numerous examinations for medicolegal purposes. During the history phase of an examination, the examinee is asked what they notice during exposure to various traffic sounds in real life. Careful note is taken of their description of what they respond to and how. They are asked about specific sounds and about their reaction in terms of pulse and breathing. Some mention little about this while others describe dramatic and significant changes in pulse when exposed to such sounds. It is not infrequent to claim that such events and response happen frequently, even daily. Toward the close of the examination, the examinee is seated near the tape recorder and asked to rest without moving for a few minutes. His pulse is taken several times. He is told that he will be exposed to a tape recording of traffic sounds. It has already been determined usually that he does have exposure to such sounds in real life...
1992 Assessing PTSD in personal injury cases Donna Veraldi PhD psychology journal 5293 A comprehensive discussion of the nature of PTSD and its symptoms is presented. PTSD may present in idiosyncractic forms but is distinguished by a chronic state of arousal that is both emotional and physiological in nature. Use of a battery of tests to validate a PTSD pattern is recommended.
1991 Biological markers in diagnosis of PTSD Freda C. Lewis-Hall, MD
psychiatry tapes 1842 Over the past decade, many biological markers associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder have been identified. Demonstration of how to identify, interpret and utilize these markers as diagnostic adjuncts.
1991 PTSD - invisible trauma CB Scrignar MD psychiatry tapes 1841 Author discusses traumatic stimuli that include toxic substances, radioactivity and pathogenic microorganisms. Focus on adverse psychological reactions to these "invisible stressors."
1991 Police misconduct cases and PTSD John Ravin MD psychiatry tapes 1843 no abstract at this time
1990 Negligent disruption of the bereavement process- post-traumatic stress disorder Phyllis Kaufman PhD, LCSW psychology journal 5146 Plaintiff suffered nightmares, emotional distress, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder related to mortuary's negligence, beginning with heartless sales pressures at the funeral home, escalating to careless facial cosmetic applications and exhibition of loved one in defective coffin with traces of blood on the lining.
1989 Hostages in jail takeover: PTSD as a compensable industrial injury Franklin Master MD psychiatry tapes 1789 Prison psychiatrist had occasion to evaluate felons (for competency and sanity) and victims (for treatment of reactive depression and anxiety) in the wake of a Las Vegas City Jail takeover. He discusses the case in detail, focusing on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder suffered by the confinement officers, a precedent setting cause of action claim within the state industrial insurance system.
1989 PTSD in the work setting - psychic injury, medical diagnosis, treatment litigation John Ravin MD
psychiatry journal 5265 The failure of the authors of APA's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders to come to grips with the medical needs of traumatized and psychologically injured workers may prevent many employees from obtaining just and adequate compensation and treatment for their psychological problems and disability. Six PTSD illustrated cases in the work setting are reviewed. Treatment considerations are discussed.
1987 PTSD in police officers -functional impairment in personal and work-related spheres Jerome Platt PhD
Stephen Husband MA
psychology tape 10150 Police officers face a high degree of stress in their daily work, frequently resulting in functional impairment of officers in both personal and work-related spheres. Author identifies stressors, characteristics of officers likely to be most or least successful in coping with these stresses and to be able to recognize signs and symptoms by which to determine various stages of stress disorders.
1987 Posttraumatic stress disorder-forensic considerations and treatment-three cases Eva Rado MD psychiatry journal 5257 Three PTSD cases are presented: stabbing of a hospitalized psychotic patient; a motor vehicle accident victim with a previous history of sexual assault; and a motor vehicle accident involving PTSD with panic attacks. The mental health of the injured patient, prior to the legal outcome, is the most significant factor in the legal outcome of the case. If previous mental disorder did in fact exist, its presence ought not invalidate the claim for damages resulting from aggravation or flare-up of the previous condition; however, favorable resolution of the patient-litigant s case will require the most circumspect examination in order to document the exact nature of any preexisting psychological difficulty.
1984 PTSD in criminal defense cases Joel Dreyer, MD
psychiatry tapes 1741 Speaker discusses posttraumatic disorder in terms of its applications to legal defense proceedings, using six legal cases in which he testified as an expert witness.
1983 Psychological and forensic considerations in the treatment of PTSD Barton Singer PhD psychology journal 5281 Posttraumatic Stress Disorder is one of the more difficult psychiatric conditions to treat. Important complications and special problems involved in understanding the nature of the illness and its most effective treatment are discussed. Case study illustrates the clinical and forensic issues. Individuals with certain personality traits are more predisposed to the disorder.