YEAR

ETHICS

AUTHOR SOURCE SELECTION ABSTRACT
2009 Making recommendations in child custody forensic examinations-utilitarian and ethical considerations Daniel Lobel PhD psychology CD 10588 Prior to the current decade forensic evaluators in contested divorces and custody cases routinely made recommendations to the court about assignment of custodial duties and structuring of visitation. Over the past several years the ability of examiners to make valid recommendations in this area has been challenged on scientific, legal and ethical grounds. This presentation will help attendees understand and evaluate the challenges so that they can make recommendations regarding child custody and visitation that are scientifically, legally and ethically defensible with confidence. Implications for the profession of including/excluding recommendations for the perceived utility of evaluations will also be discussed. Daniel S. Lobel, Ph.D. is in private practice, and Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.
2009 Ethics, rules, and risk management Donna Veraldi PhD psychology CD 10591 Differences between ethics and rules, how standards of care are developed, how they impact practice, and whether standards of care have worked to improve care or to play a major factor in risk management issues will be presented. Attendees will have a chance to 1) discuss our current ethical guidelines and to consider both the positive and negative impact of these guidelines, 2) discuss whether our profession, which is a scientifically-oriented and research-based profession, follows its own standards in coming to conclusions about research that can affect professional practice. Donna M. Veraldi, Ph.D. is in private practice in Billings, Montana.
2009 Ethics and the law-update and overview Martin Williams PhD psychology CD 10592 Primary goal of the presentation is to make attendees aware of the insoluble tension between practicing from a defensive, risk management posture and practicing in a creative, genuine and inspired style. Attendees will learn the background, as well as recent changes/updates of the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct published by the APA and how these principles translate into real-world legal cases. Martin H. Williams, Ph.D. is a clinical and forensic psychologist who consults and testifies nationwide before psychotherapy and healthcare regulatory boards regarding ethics matters.
2008 Ethics and the law - update and overview Martin H Williams PhD psychology CD 11002 Primary goal of the presentation is to make attendees aware of the insoluble tension between practicing from a defensive, risk management posture and practicing in a creative, genuine and inspired style. Attendees will learn the background, as well as recent changes/updates of the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct published by the APA and how these principles translate into real-world legal cases
2008 Unweaving the enigma of endangered psychiatric ethics in corrections Richard L. Grant, M.D. psychiatry CD 10619 Widely acknowledged as our contemporary de facto mental hospitals, the correctional institutions of the United States contain many inmates with recognized and yet to be recognized mental disorders affecting their behavior or mental suffering. As "total institutions" (Goffman) with many sometimes conflicting goals and purposes, our jails and prisons nevertheless are required by statute to provide mental health treatment for those inmates. The compromises to the full ethical provision of that care by psychiatrists are profound. This presentation attempts to lay bare and disentangle the diverse influences leading to these compromises. By such clarification, perhaps a way forward for achieving maximally ethical and improved psychiatric care in our correctional institutions may be derived.--Richard L. Grant, M.D. is a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, and practices forensic psychiatry.
2008 Ethics and the law: update and overview Martin H. Williams, Ph.D. psychology CD 10659 Primary goal of the presentation is to make attendees aware of the insoluble tension between practicing from a defensive, risk management posture and practicing in a creative, genuine and inspired style. Attendees will learn the background, as well as recent changes/updates of the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct published by the APA and how these principles translate into real-world legal cases.--Martin H. Williams, Ph.D. is a clinical and forensic psychologist who consults and testifies nationwide before psychotherapy and healthcare regulatory boards regarding ethics matters. He served on the Ethics Code Task Force of Psychologists in Independent Practice, a division of the APA.
2007 Ethics and the Law: Update and Overview Martin H. Williams, Ph.D. psychology CD 10347 Primary goal of the presentation is to make attendees aware of the insoluble tension between practicing from a defensive, risk management posture and practicing in a creative, genuine and inspired style. Attendees will learn the background of the APA ethics code principles and how these principles translate into real-world legal cases.
2007 Ethical Considerations in the Neuropsychological Assessment of Remote MTBI Allan Posthuma, Ph.D. psychology CD 10349 Prospective control group studies indicate that the window of opportunity for neuropsychological testing differentiating specific deficits from a MTBI (Mild Traumatic Brain Injury) is between 3 to 12 months post injury. Yet the courtroom typically hears neuropsychological "evidence" based on testing conducted 2 or 3 years post injury. Daubert and our own professional standards require scientific support for our evidence. This session will review the data, some possible reasons why we violate these standards, and the ethical issues that arise. Audience participation will be encouraged.
2007 Preparing Ethical Child Custody Evaluations Kathleen M. O Brien, Ph.D. psychology CD 10351 During the presenter s eight-year tenure as a member of the Illinois Psychological Association Ethics Committee, the most common ethical complaints against members have involved child custody evaluations. At times, even the party receiving custody of the children has filed complaints against the evaluator. Despite clear APA standards and specific child custody guidelines, providing neutral, equitable, balanced, and workable recommendations is a daunting task. This presentation will autopsy a child custody report and explore its ethical strengths and weaknesses, particularly addressing the more subtle nuances less often considered in the literature.
2007 Ethical Issues in Assessment Selection for Forensic Evaluations Marc L. Zimmermann, Ph.D. psychology CD 10352 Some of the psychological test publishers are providing misinformation in their manuals and sales material concerning the parameters of the test and the population with which it should be used. An example will be provided concerning one of the most used tests in psychological assessment. Attendees will learn how to properly assess the usefulness of a psychological test for the person upon whom it will be used, and how to avoid being impeached for improper and unethical use of a psychological test
2007 Evaluating Low IQ Spanish speakers with Standardized Tests in Capital Cases: Clinical, Methodological, and Ethical Issues
Ines Monguio, Ph.D.
Dan Close, Ph.D.
psychology CD 10369 Spanish speaking individuals are on the increase in the U.S. criminal justice system. There are challenges in providing accurate assessment to those of low intelligence. The role of culture, potential errors in using existing standardized tests, limited language skills of the inmate, and the skill of the evaluator are all factors to be considered. Ethical considerations related to the Atkins case will be addressed.
2007 Forensic Ethics, Sanism and Pretextuality Michael Perlin JD psychiatry CD 10387 Do all expert witnesses profess to be neutral? What are the factors that make it less likely that experts who profess to be are, in fact, neutral? To what extent do pre-existing biases color expert testimony? How can the legal system seek to resolve the underlying dilemma? The so-called "battle of the experts" is, in most cases, a myth. Yet, contested cases are vivid (not coincidentally, often because they involve high-profile crimes, victims or defendants, thus assuring saturation media coverage), and we tend to make many of our assumptions about the criminal justice system based on our knowledge about this relatively-small database. And it is these cases that help shape our focus on an important question of forensic ethics: to what extent does a witness's pre-existing value system of political, cultural, and social beliefs shape her expert opinions (especially, though not exclusively, in criminal and quasi-criminal cases)? Michael L. Perlin, JD is Professor of Law at New York Law School, where he is also the director of the Online Mental Disability Law Program and the International Mental Disability Law Reform Project. He has written 17 books and nearly 200 articles.

2006 Ethical issues in the current disposition and treatment of sexually violent predators John Douard PhD, JD
Richard Friedman JD
psychiatry journal 7045 After discussing the two broad categories of clinical psychiatric and psychological ethics, i.e., duty-based and utilitarian, the authors apply these analyses to the disposition and treatment of a particular class of individuals, sexually violent predators (SVPs) in the current clinical, legal, and forensic climate. The authors assert that much of the clinical, legal, and forensic activity pertaining to SVPs is pretextual, and based on false premises of clinical science. The authors conclude with a caveat for clinicians practicing in this area. A typical case is discussed.

2006 Ethics and the law: update and overview Martin Williams PhD psychology tape 3248 Topics to be discussed will include: confidentiality pitfalls and limits; what a reasonable psychologist is expected to do (and is that reasonable?); dealing with board and civil complaints and how not to dig your own grave; the curse of risk management; multiple relationships not unethical (but try telling that to the plaintiff!). The primary goal of the presentation is to make attendees aware of the insoluble tension between practicing from a defensive, risk management posture and practicing in a creative, genuine and inspired style. Attendees will learn the background of the ethics code principles and how these principles translate into real-world legal cases.
2006 Ethical issues in the current disposition and treatment of sexually violent predators John Douard PhD, JD
Richard Friedman JD
psychiatry tape 3095 After discussing the two broad categories of clinical psychiatric and psychological ethics, i.e., duty-based and utilitarian, the authors apply these analyses to the disposition and treatment of a particular class of individuals, sexually violent predators (SVPs) in the current clinical, legal, and forensic climate. The authors assert that much of the clinical, legal, and forensic activity pertaining to SVPs is pretextual, and based on false premises of clinical science. The authors conclude with a caveat for clinicians practicing in this area. A typical case is discussed.

2006 Ethics and the law: update and overview Martin Williams PhD psychology CD 10722 Topics to be discussed will include: confidentiality pitfalls and limits; what a reasonable psychologist is expected to do (and is that reasonable?); dealing with board and civil complaints and how not to dig your own grave; the curse of risk management; multiple relationships not unethical (but try telling that to the plaintiff!). The primary goal of the presentation is to make attendees aware of the insoluble tension between practicing from a defensive, risk management posture and practicing in a creative, genuine and inspired style. Attendees will learn the background of the ethics code principles and how these principles translate into real-world legal cases.
2005 Ethics and the law: update and overview of the 2002 ethics code of the American Psychological Association
Martin H Williams PhD psychology tape 3183 The topics to be discussed will include: confidentiality: pitfalls and limits; what a reasonable psychologist is expected to do (and is that reasonable?); dealing with board and civil complaints and how not to dig your own grave; the curse of risk management; multiple relationships not unethical (but try telling that to the plaintiff!). The primary goal of the presentation is to make attendees aware of the insoluble tension between practicing from a defensive, risk management posture and practicing in a creative, genuine and inspired style. Attendees will learn the background of the ethics code principles and how these principles translate into real-world legal cases.
2005 Ethical dilemmas in forensic practice Marc L Zimmermann PhD psychology tape 3190 A number of situations which challenge the ethics of forensic practitioners will be presented and discussed. Audience participation will be encouraged. Also, brief review of changes/updates to the laws, regulations and ethics codes pertaining to the practice of psychology will be discussed. Attendees will learn various methods of considering and solving ethical issues; will be reminded of the ethical principles under which they operate and how to overcome what appear to be insurmountable ethical conflicts.
2004 Ethics and the Law Martin H Williams PhD psychology tape 3088 Brief review of changes/updates to the laws, regulations and ethics codes pertaining to the practice of psychology in California.
2004 Ethical risks in child custody: where is the wizard of oz when you need him? Ira Gorman PhD psychology journal 6213 Like Dorothy, mental health professionals in the field of child custody are at times caught in a tornado of events. Dorothy in her quest to return home encountered her share of trauma the Wicked Witch of the West, flying monkeys, lions, tigers and bears. She was fortunate. Providing her consultation, nurturance, and guidance were a host of willing and able supporters an intelligent scarecrow, a courageous lion, a compassionate tin-man, an endearing good witch and the Wizard himself. She did not have to confront ethics committees, licensing boards, combative attorneys, litigious clients, and impatient judges. Mental health professionals must often find their way home alone without a well marked yellow brick road. This article will provide some of those markers to help the professional circumvent dangerous obstacles along the road home.
2003 The show and tell murder case: legal and ethical issues Franklin Master MD psychiatry tape 3027 At age 13, Sandra was interviewed by the author as a private therapy patient after she had witnessed a fatal shooting. Two years later, she was a principal defendant in the brutal murder of a young Canadian male tourist in an isolated desert area near Las Vegas. The relationship of past traumatic events and current criminal behavior, and posttraumatic stress disorder as a criminal psychiatric defense will be explored.
2003 The ethics of good report writing Allan R Gerson PhD
psychology tape 3031 The presenters have examined numerous psychological evaluation reports in the workers' compensation system. Reports containing opinions contrary to data, others citing dated references, some citing one s own "tests" and those defaming opposing examiners are frequent occurrences. Ways to avoid ethical pitfalls will be discussed. Appropriate use of histories, test data and ethics will be covered along both APA and workers compensation guidelines.
2003 Legal, ethical and practice issues that face the forensic psychologist-workshop (2 tapes) Jack S Annon PhD psychology tape 3034 This workshop is designed to familiarize the forensic psychologist with the tools available for risk assessment and management planning as they relate to ethical and legal issues in the practice of forensic psychology. The vast array of forensic ethical codes, mandatory codes of conduct, and the numerous APA and Practice Directorate Policies, and Guidelines that attorneys use as "standards of practice" to question and cross examine will also be reviewed. Limits to confidentiality, informed consent, record keeping, responding to subpoenas will be discussed. This workshop, along with the three earlier presentations on ethics, is designed to meet the California CE ethics requirement.
2003 Risk management-legal and ethical medications Rahn Bailey MD psychiatry journal 7076 no abstract
2001 Ethical issues in medical research- misconduct Douglas Dolnak DO
Laura Roberts MD
psychiatry journal 5376 While the conduct of most medical research is honorable, it is increasingly recognized that research misconduct occurs and its prevalence and true impact are unknown. In this article, we first will outline contemporary definitions of misconduct. Fabrication, falsification, plagiarism and other dishonorable behaviors are among the current definitions of "research misconduct." Next we will characterize what has been documented regarding the prevalence and impact of misconduct in academia and industry based on a review of the literature over the last ten years. Scientific misconduct may exist in the pharmaceutical industry, but has received little recognition. Examples of several proven cases of misconduct are summarized. Finally we will outline strategies for preventing, identifying and responding to misconduct in medical research.
2001 Ethical evaluations in the workers' compensation system Marshall Cherkas MD, PhD psychiatry tapes 1043 no abstract
2001 The placebo-ethics, deception and quackery Lara Dunn MD psychiatry journal 7086 no abstract
2000 Ethical issues in forensic psychiatry Richard May MD psychiatry tapes 9043 Every profession has its own set of ethical standards and guidelines. The AMA s Principles of Medical Ethics are standards of conduct. The APA has Annotations to AMA Principles, especially applicable to psychiatry and many relevant to forensic psychiatry. Ethical guidelines, however, do not have a solution to all ethical problems; there can be conflicts between ethical guidelines and values. The relationship between ethical codes and judicial decisions and ethical dilemmas and violations will be discussed.
2000 Ethical principles in forensic psychiatry for the next millennium David Glaser MD psychiatry tapes 1023 Ethical issues pervade the practice of forensic psychiatry at many levels and in a variety of contexts. A forensic evaluatee may be seduced into a false sense of complacency and reveal more than they otherwise would if they fully appreciated the adversarial nature of the evaluation. Psychological testing might be grossly at odds with the initial opinion gleaned from an interview. While ethical issues can emanate from both sides (attorney or expert), the dance between an expert and a criminal attorney can really push the ethical envelope. Following this presentation, attendees will be more aware of potential ethical pitfalls in civil and criminal work, more vigilant to potentially problematic areas in the actual evaluation, and will learn how to be more effective and competent forensic psychiatrists.
2000 Inherent problems in current, proposed APA ethics code Martin H Williams PhD psychology tape 1017 The APA Ethical Principles for Psychologists and Code of Conduct attempts to combine an educational document with a set of enforceable standards of practice. This well intentioned effort can lead to significant professional damage when psychologists face licensing or civil complaints. This presentation will address practical, moral and legal concerns which must be addressed if the proposed ethics code revision is to succeed. Attendees will develop a deeper understanding of the weaknesses of the current and proposed APA Ethics Code, especially regarding its tendency to favor plaintiffs filing complaints against psychologists. Attendees will understand issues inherent in ethics testimony from both defense and plaintiffs viewpoints and will become aware of the drawbacks of certain risk management strategies.
2000 Ethical and practice issues that face the forensic psychologist Jack S Annon PhD psychology tape 1026 This presentation is designed to familiarize the forensic psychologist with the tools available for risk assessment and management planning as they relate to the ethical and legal issues in the practice of forensic psychology. The vast array of forensic ethical codes, mandatory codes of conduct, and the numerous APA, and Practice Directorate Policies and Guidelines that attorneys are using as "standards of practice" to question and cross-examine will also be reviewed. Limits to confidentiality, informed consent, record keeping, billing and money matters, responding to subpoenas, and other issues will also be discussed.

2000 Practice and ethical issues of blending psychology and the law in disability evaluations Ron Hood PhD psychology tape 9042 no abstract
2000 A brief review of the ethical and legal concerns of treating voluntary psychiatric patients in a locked unit M Dhyanne Warner PhD psychiatry journal 5379 This review discusses a common and accepted practice of treating voluntary psychiatric inpatients on locked units without adequate clinical considerations. The authors examine the hypothesis that the legal and ethical doctrine of treatment in the least restrictive manner is frequently undermined by this practice. Pertinent historical philosophies and legal precedents of involuntary patients' civil commitment are reviewed and their implications for voluntary patients are examined. The authors conclude that economic concerns, as well as hospital and physician interests, may be limiting voluntary patients' access to open units, thus diminishing optimal clinical care and undermining the least restrictive treatment doctrine.
1999 Ethical dilemmas in right to die issues
Valerie R. McClain, Psy.D. psychology tape 1205 Psychologists and health care providers face increasingly more challenging ethical dilemmas as medical technology lengthens potential biological life span. Increased expertise in assessment, legal knowledge and health care standards of practice is imperative. A multidisciplinary team approach to enhance decision making is proposed including medical, psychosocial and legal perspectives. Relevant legal, medical and psychological liability is addressed within the context of anticipating potential malpractice accusations. Clinical examples will be used to illustrate ethical challenges and potential solutions. Particular emphasis will be placed on quality of life issues, ageism, competing interests and the changing status of mental capacity.
1999 Risk and ethical practice of forensic psychology in the year 2000 (1 of 2) Michele H. Licht psychology tape 9081 Seminar conducted by guest speaker, Michele Licht, J.D., the prevailing attorney in the landmark CAPP v. Rank lawsuit insuring that psychologists would have primary responsibility to admit and manage their hospitalized patients. This seminar will provide participants a forum for evaluating their own forensic practice from a legal and ethical perspective, and will instruct the practitioner about how to identify areas of risk and how to take prophylactic action.
1999 Ethical issues in assessment of the brain injured and impaired individual Jerry L. Brittain, PhD psychology tape 1127 As a discipline forensic work is an area where ethics can easily become the subject of focus. Examples within the community in the last three years include whether or not to follow a court order and allow another person (attorney or psychologist) to sit in on one s examination. Issues of informed consent are also increasingly being raised. The presenter will focus on four major areas of ethical conflict, will give case examples and vignettes of each, and will cite the relevant ethical and professional standards in an attempt to see if they can provide the much needed guidance for those using them. Specific proposals will be given on how to avoid such conflicts or how to cope with them in the best manner possible if confronted.
1999 Risk management and ethical practice in the 21st Century (1 of 2) Penny Clemmons, Ph.D., J.D. psychology tape 1030 Psychologists are challenged on a daily basis to meet competing ethical, moral, legal, and therapeutic standards and goals. This seminar will focus on questions most frequently asked by practitioners to assure compliance with complex criteria. Didactic material will be presented followed by a panel discussion by senior clinicians.
1999 Ethical dilemmas in right to die issues Valerie McClain PsyD
Shelley Tindell
Stephen Hall MA
psychology journal 548 Psychologists and health care providers face increasingly more challenging ethical dilemmas as medical technology lengthens potential biological life span. Increased expertise in assessment, legal knowledge and health care standards of practice is imperative. A multidisciplinary team approach to enhance decision-making is proposed including medical, psychosocial and legal perspectives. Relevant legal, medical and psychological liability is addressed within the context of anticipating potential malpractice accusations. Clinical examples are used to illustrate ethical challenges and potential solutions. Particular emphasis is placed on quality of life issues, ageism/discrimination, competing interests and the changing status of mental capacity.
1999 Risk and ethical practice of forensic psychology in the year 2000 Michele H. Licht
psychology tape 9082 Seminar conducted by Guest Speaker, Michele Licht, J.D., the prevailing attorney in the landmark CAPP v. Rank lawsuit insuring that psychologists would have primary responsibility to admit and manage their hospitalized patients. This seminar will provide participants a forum for evaluating their own forensic practice from a legal and ethical perspective, and will instruct the practitioner about how to identify areas of risk and how to take prophylactic action. The year 2000 marks a turning point in the practice of forensic psychology. Technological advances raise the standard of care while creating new pitfalls for the practitioner. Anxiety and resentment fester as seasoned professionals are confronted with ever increasing restrictions on therapeutic practice. Dr. Penny Clemmons, psychologist and attorney, will focus on how the veteran psychologist can meet these challenges. A Panel Discussion will follow Ms. Licht's and Dr. Clemmons presentations, with focus on professional ethical and legal issues raised by seminar participants and the audience.
1999 Risk management and ethical practice in the 21st Century (2 of 2) Penny Clemmons, Ph.D., J.D. psychology tape 1031 no abstract
1998 Mismanagement of countertransference in PTSD: ethical and legal violations
Joyce Vesper PhD psychiatry journal 873 Therapists working with traumatized people are confronted with intense emotions and bizarre stories that challenge reality and reach into the most sinister side of humanity. Attachment problems, control issues, and dominance dilemmas surface during the course of therapy. Clients pressure therapists to reenact the trauma or divert the memories rather than remember and purge the horrors from their minds. The insistence that the therapist relive or distract the traumatic event(s) challenges treatment methodology, frustrates therapists, and creates opportunities for dual relationships, ethical violations, and malpractice offenses. In order to avoid these pitfalls, the therapist must have a sound grasp of trauma-based psychotherapeutic techniques, knowledge of trauma theory, and a healthy understanding of the treatment role within the therapeutic relationship.
1998 Mismanagement of counertransference in PTSD-ethical and legal violations Joyce Vesper PhD psychology journal 8174 no abstract
1997 Ethical and forensic issues sexual orientation and child custody James E Stark PhD psychology tape 10125 This presentation will include a review of research relative to sexual orientation, parenting issues, and legal determinations. Legal arguments for and against lesbian and gay custody of minor children will be explored as well as ethical issues from a psychological and legal perspective. Special attention will be focused on myths concerning lesbians and gays. Participants will also learn to appreciate the legal struggles of lesbian and gay parents concerning custody of their children.
1997 Foundations of professional ethics-applications to forensic practice John Wisner MD psychiatry tapes 1279 The traditional western professions of medicine, law, and divinity have in common the potential to apply their specialized knowledge base and authority toward self-serving as well as patient/client/penitent benefit. This special vulnerability formed the basis for the expectations and prohibitions that comprise the Hippocratic code of ethics in medicine, and its subsequent elaboration and current formulations. The practical applications of these ethical "do s and don ts" will be discussed along with the specific boundaries which apply to forensic practice. Participants will be able to identify the practical goals of professional ethical codes, the ethical boundaries which apply in forensic settings, and the similarities and differences between legal and medical ethical standards

1997 Medical ethics and human rights: a case discussion Paul Nassar, MD
psychiatry tapes 1273 An outspoken Israeli psychiatrist was disciplined by the Israeli Medical Association for speaking out against the use of psychiatrists to advance state policy. The case will be presented in detail, with illustrations of how intrusion of government or ideology can corrupt the role of the physician. In a democratic society, the physician must maintain the integrity of his ethical obligations to the patient and remain immune from majority opinion. This presentation will explore dangers that face psychiatric consultants when faced with the challenges of state policy.
1997 Developing life histories for use in mitigation- ethical, clinical, and practical concerns Mindy Rosenberg PhD
psychology tape 10122 Psychologists are often asked to develop defendants' life histories for use in the sentencing phase of capital cases, habeus corpus petitions, or to inform guilt phase issues. At present, there is no agreed upon standard of practice for life histories. Focus: ethical and professional concerns and practical considerations in working effectively with attorneys; typical clinical issues in the history taking process; the role of psychological testing; the need to evaluate for multiple victimization; the role of protective and risk factors; and impairment in a variety of psychological domains.
1997 Nuts and bolts issues-circumstances leading up to board complaints, ethical complaints, legal action, malpractice, criminal action and what to do what these happen Penny Clemmons, Ph.D., J.D. psychology tape 9093 no abstract
1996 Single parent child custody evaluations- technical and ethical issues Steven Klee, PhD psychology tape 1423 Psychologists are often asked to conduct child custody evaluations when only one parent is available for examination. The question arises as to whether such evaluations should be attempted and, if so, what are the limitations of the findings. The present paper, using numerous case examples, will argue that one parent evaluations can provide useful information to the courts as long as the findings and conclusions are discussed within the context of strengths and weaknesses of the parent examined without extensive comparisons between parents. Participants will learn about general issues involved in conducting a custody evaluation and specific difficulties and limitations involving single parent assessments will be explored.
1996 Ethical and legal considerations with self mutilating and lethal clients Joyce Vesper PhD psychology journal 8164 Self mutilation is the act of deliberately harming oneself without the conscious intent to die. Reasons given for self harm in the psychiatric patient include the need to see blood to know that the person is alive, the need to derail thinking about one s emotional problems, or the need to reduce psychic pain. Dissociative patients use self harm to diminish depersonalization, distract from sexual excitation, release anger, and gain relief from feelings of depression, alienation, and detachment Self inflicted violence is a form of coping with the pain left over from years of trauma and abuse. To the survivor, self mutilation is a technique developed to avoid suicide or homicide. To the clinician, it is a symptom of a major mental illness. Hence treaters attempt to control the mechanism. In reality, self mutilation is a symptom of a deeper psychological problem that is related to the family or history of abuse. Therefore as historical information is uncovered, self inflicted violence escalates. The treating therapist is faced with both an ethical and legal dilemma of whether to proceed with treatment and risk further self mutilation, suicide and homicide attempts or stop the exploratory work to keep the client alive and/or protect potential harm to third parties.
1994 Forensic psychiatry in the '90s and ethical issues Robert M Toborowsky MD psychiatry tapes 1930 The ethical responsibilities of the forensic psychiatrist is to refrain from exploiting patients; maintain confidentiality; respect the privacy, rights, and integrity of others; obtain informed consent; adhere to treatment contracts; avoid conflicts of interest; respect the law; deal honestly with patients and colleagues; and strive to report colleagues who are unethical. These and other considerations will be discussed and expanded in this presentation.
1993 Legal and ethical dilemmas in community-based sex offender treatment (2) Mark Whitehill PhD
psychology tape 10012 Community based sex offender treatment is fraught with ethical and legal dilemmas: What is the ethical and legal course of action when an offender discloses in treatment hitherto unreported victims and is there a course of action that can be both? How is the ethical sex offender therapist to use the polygraph, given its inadmissibility in most courts and the APA's position paper disavowing its usage as "...there is no physiologic pattern associated uniquely with deception"? Should a sliding scale be used in establishing fees? To what extent is the therapist the agent of the court or the agent of the client?
1992 Ethics in contemporary medicine: euthanasia and including the autopsy report of Marjorie Wantz in the Kevorkian case Gerald G. Pope, MD psychiatry tapes 1940 no abstract
1989 Ethical dilemmas encountered in psychiatric practice Anthony Oliver MD psychiatry tapes 10090 Speaker confronts fundamental ethical issues involved in legally related psychiatric practice. Potentially compromising practice situations and professional integrity are examined.
1988 Ethical considerations of involuntary detentions of mentally disordered persons Telford Moore PhD psychology tape 10067 The author examines detention of mentally disordered citizens in light of ethical considerations that inhere in due process and moral reasoning. Specifically, principles of autonomy, maleficence, beneficence and justice are reviewed
1988 Effective and ethical independent psychological evaluations and file reviews Jerome Platt PhD
Stephen Husband MA
psychology tape 10068 Independent psychological evaluations are case reviews in civil litigation and insurance matters are discussed. Pointers given in conducting a file review or independent evaluation, writing the report and communicating the results to the referring party.
1988 Ethical, clinical, emotional aspects of testifying in death penalty cases (1) Chamberlain TJ MD psychiatry tapes 1817 Interfacing clinical, emotional and ethical aspects of evaluating and testifying as a psychiatrist in death penalty cases. (2 tapes)
1988 Ethical, clinical, emotional aspects of testifying in death penalty cases (2 tapes) Chamberlain TJ MD psychiatry tapes 1818 Interfacing clinical, emotional and ethical aspects of evaluating and testifying as a psychiatrist/psychologist in death penalty cases.
1988 Ethical considerations of involuntary detentions of mentally disordered persons Telford Moore PhD psychology journal 5232 The author examines detention of mentally disordered citizens in light of ethical considerations that inhere in due process and moral reasoning. Specifically, principles of autonomy, maleficence, beneficence and justice are reviewed
1987 Forensic psychological evaluations through an interpreter: legal and ethical issues Jose LaCalle PhD Psychology tape 10181 In California, as in many other states, approximately 25 percent of forensic psychological and psychiatric evaluations are performed by professionals who do not speak the language of their clients. Use of an unqualified interpreter in legal cases may signify a miscarriage of justice.
1987 Forensic psychological evaluations through an interpreter: legal and ethical issues Jose LaCalle PhD psychology journal 6020 In California, as in many other states, approximately 25 percent of forensic psychological and psychiatric evaluations are performed by professionals who do not speak the language of their clients. Use of an unqualified interpreter in legal cases may signify a miscarriage of justice.
1986 Pedophilia: diagnostic concepts, treatment and ethical considerations Fred Berlin MD and Edgar Krout MA psychiatry journal 5062 Over the past decade we have become increasingly aware of the extent and magnitude of the sexual victimization of children in our society and considerable efforts have been made to offer help and assistance to these victims. However, to a large extent, their perpetrators have been regarded more as offenders deserving punishment than as persons needing help. This paper serves to broaden the base of our knowledge in regard to an adult's sexual attraction to a child and helps us differentiate between the perpetrator and his offense.
1985 Therapist-patient sex- legal and ethical implications
Angela Raimo EdD, JD psychology journal 5262 Civil litigation has increased in the areas of therapists' liability for damages arising out of a breach of the therapist-patient relationship, especially in the area of sexual intimacies. Courts rely heavily on the consensus of qualified opinion in the professional disciplines involved. Abuse of process, damages, "heart balm" statutes, misuse of transference, question of physical contact, malpractice discussed. Landmark legal cases, such as Roy v Hartogs, discussed, cases illustrative of abuse of the psychotherpeutic process.
1984 Competency and consent in psychiatric treatment- medical ethics, legal trends Glen Peterson MD psychiatry journal 5205 Opportunities to help, or to abuse, are magnified when physical confinement or other enforced measures are sanctioned by society and exercised by the physician; Medical ethics in conflict with legal trends. "Excessive and sweeping legal constrictions of the conditions and techniques of psychiatric treatment do not well serve the mentally ill."
1984 Police use of investigative hypnosis- scientism, ethics and power games Martin Reiser EdD psychology journal 5272 The director of the behavioral science services in the Los Angeles Police Department argues that hypnosis can be useful when employed as an investigative aid to enhance recall of witnesses in major crime cases. He explains that hypnosis is not a truth detection instrument such as the polygraph, voiceprints, voice stress analyzers, but rather an interview technique. Hypersuggestibility, the police as lay hypnotists, hypnosis and truth, memory distortion, related memory theories and models, scientific reliability of testimony, precedent legal cases and current status of investigative hypnosis are included. A brief second article by the author, LAPD- the police behavioral scientist is appended with this paper. Dr. Reiser, an educational psychologist, established the Law Enforcement Hypnosis Institute in Los Angeles in 1972.