YEAR

CHILD CUSTODY

AUTHOR SOURCE SELECTION ABSTRACT
2009 Overnight visitation in custody evluations of young children Mark Goldstein PhD psychology CD 10580 The issue of overnight visitation and the literature related to this topic will be addressed. Issues of attachment, family dynamics, history of parenting, level of conflict and the psychological make-up of the parents and child will be examined. The use of observational techniques and psychological tests in assessing the appropriateness of overnight visitation with very young children will also be explored. Case studies will be presented. Mark L. Goldstein, Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist and custody evaluator in the Chicago area.
2009 Making recommendations in child custody forensic examinations-utilitarian and ethical considerations Daniel Lobel PhD psychology CD 10588 Prior to the current decade forensic evaluators in contested divorces and custody cases routinely made recommendations to the court about assignment of custodial duties and structuring of visitation. Over the past several years the ability of examiners to make valid recommendations in this area has been challenged on scientific, legal and ethical grounds. This presentation will help attendees understand and evaluate the challenges so that they can make recommendations regarding child custody and visitation that are scientifically, legally and ethically defensible with confidence. Implications for the profession of including/excluding recommendations for the perceived utility of evaluations will also be discussed. Daniel S. Lobel, Ph.D. is in private practice, and Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.
2009 Complicated and high conflict child custody evaluations-case study of sexual abuse allegations in a custody disputee Kathleen O'Brien, PhD psychology CD 10589 This presentation will explore a ten-year custody dispute involving ongoing allegations of child sexual abuse and efforts to limit parent contact. This case required careful exploration of the allegations, while respecting the boundaries between law enforcement roles and the role of child custody evaluator. The presentation will address the ethical and professional pitfalls inherent in the case, especially given all four children s denial of sexual abuse. Attendees should be able to 1) describe the ethical considerations that are inherent in child custody evaluations which include allegations of sexual abuse, including appropriate assessment considerations, especially appropriate use of psychological testing; 2) delineate the role differences between law enforcement and custody evaluators in determining the presence or absence of child sexual abuse.

2008 A model program for effective parenting, empowering of the children and conflict reduction in contested custody cases Gerald L Klein JD pychology CD 10810 Parenting at its best is challenging. During custody disputes it is much more difficult. The parents are wounded and focused inward; the children are left voiceless and used as pawns, receiving distorted information from parents and others who "mean well," while being intentionally kept in the dark by the court system. This presentation will examine the elements of a successful therapeutically grounded educational program and the techniques that effectively address those issues.
2008 Test-generated child custody hypotheses-new statistical data Barry Bricklin PhD
Gail Elliot PhD
psychology CD 10811 Two tests useful in custody decision-making have been newly normed, creating a database of 3,800 cases. Hypotheses can be generated regarding the degree to which interactions between a child and a parent lead to comfortable and effective behaviors on the child's part. A statistically derived observation scheme was used to validate this hypothesis and others. The test data can illuminate the quality of a child's comfort level when alone with a parent, in the simultaneous presence of both parents and in other contexts. The focus of our talk will not be on new statistics, but on case examples that reflect them in clinical us
2008 Child custody and visitation rights when autism is a consideration David Holmes EdD psychology CD 10812 Whenever custody or visitation issues occur during divorce proceedings there is most often significant debate over which parent should have the lead authority or no authority at all. When there are 'typically developing' children being considered these deliberations are frequently litigious and almost always emotional in nature. When autism is a consideration the stakes are even higher. This presentation will address the variables that must be addressed during such hearings, when autism is a consideration
2008 A model program for effective parenting, empowering of the children
and conflict reduction in contested custody cases
Gerald L. Klein, J.D.
Sara Doudna-Klein
psychology CD 10650 Parenting at its best is challenging. During custody disputes it is much more difficult. The parents are wounded and focused inward; the children are left voiceless and used as pawns, receiving distorted information from parents and others who "mean well," while being intentionally kept in the dark by the court system. This presentation will examine the elements of a successful therapeutically grounded educational program and the techniques that effectively address those issues.--Gerald L. Klein, J.D. is a certified family law specialist focusing on child custody issues. He has practiced for over 30 years, has volunteered as a judge in both family and juvenile court. He is the founder and executive director of Kids First. Sara Doudna-Klein is a licensed marriage and family therapist practicing for over 25 years. Ms. Doudna-Klein is the Clinical Director of Kids First and was instrumental in its development.
2008 Test-generated child custody hypotheses: new statistical data Barry Bricklin, Ph.D.
Gail Elliot, Ph.D.
psychology CD 10652 Two tests useful in custody decision-making have been newly normed, creating a database of 3,800 cases. Hypotheses can be generated regarding the degree to which interactions between a child and a parent lead to comfortable and effective behaviors on the child's part. A statistically derived observation scheme was used to validate this hypothesis and others. The test data can illuminate the quality of a child's comfort level when alone with a parent, in the simultaneous presence of both parents and in other contexts. The focus of our talk will not be on new statistics, but on case examples that reflect them in clinical use.--Dr. Barry Bricklin is on the faculty of Widener University. Dr. Gail Elliot is head of Family Research, Bricklin Associates. They are the authors of books, articles and book chapters on custody issues.
2008 Child custody and visitation rights when autism is a consideration David L. Holmes, Ed.D.
Lawrence R. Jones, Esq.
psychology CD 10653 Whenever custody or visitation issues occur during divorce proceedings there is most often significant debate over which parent should have the lead authority or no authority at all. When there are 'typically developing' children being considered these deliberations are frequently litigious and almost always emotional in nature. When autism is a consideration the stakes are even higher. This presentation will address the variables that must be addressed during such hearings, when autism is a consideration.--Dr. David L. Holmes is immediate past president and founder of The Eden Family of Services and Chairman of the Panel of Professional Advisors of the Autism Society of America. Lawrence R. Jones is a family law attorney in Toms River, New Jersey. He has authored over 50 published legal articles and currently serves as the Chairman of New Jersey Lawyer magazine, the official publication of the New Jersey State Bar Association. He is well known in the autism community for his work on various public awareness projects.
2007 Use of the Rorschach in Child Custody evaluations Alissa Sherry, Ph.D. psychology CD 10343 The Rorschach Ink Blot test can be controversial in forensic settings. However, in some child custody evaluations, it can illuminate subtleties of personality that inform parenting, add important assessment information when objective tests are invalid, and subvert attempts by some to fake good on psychological testing. Presenters will explore ways of communicating the use, scoring, and interpretative results of the Rorschach to people without mental health backgrounds (i.e., attorneys, judges) in order to increase its acceptance by the court.
2007 Preparing Ethical Child Custody Evaluations Kathleen M. O Brien, Ph.D. psychology CD 10351 During the presenter s eight-year tenure as a member of the Illinois Psychological Association Ethics Committee, the most common ethical complaints against members have involved child custody evaluations. At times, even the party receiving custody of the children has filed complaints against the evaluator. Despite clear APA standards and specific child custody guidelines, providing neutral, equitable, balanced, and workable recommendations is a daunting task. This presentation will autopsy a child custody report and explore its ethical strengths and weaknesses, particularly addressing the more subtle nuances less often considered in the literature.
2006 Severe parental alienation scenarios: outpatient therapeutic protocols Dr Barry Bricklin
Dr Gail Elliot
psychology tape 3242 Traditional outpatient techniques are typically ineffective in alienation cases. Inpatient treatment may be clinically unfeasible, or the court will not order it. Successful intervention demands the following. The professional must know how to gain the cooperation of the court. Next, the professional must know the specific powers to request of the court. The professional must understand the politics of dealing with nonlocal courts, where he or she may not be a recognized expert. The professional must possess a vast toolbox of nontraditional therapies unique and specific to estrangement.
2006 Parental alienation, the 730 evaluator and the law: an attorney s perspective Gerald Klein JD
psychology tape 3253 Relevant custody law and definitions, the role of the 730 evaluator, the dynamics of parental alienation in high conflict custody cases, the elements of parental alienation, case studies and practical issues will be discussed. This presentation should increase the participant s ability to identify and recognize the signs, symptoms, interactions and family dynamics of parental alienation in the context of applicable law; and allow attendees to better understand estrangement, alignment and affinity distinctions. Participants will learn how to tackle the symptoms versus syndrome issue and how the system inherently encourages alienation.
2006 Severe parental alienation scenarios: outpatient therapeutic protocols Dr Barry Bricklin
Dr Gail Elliot
psychology CD 10716 Traditional outpatient techniques are typically ineffective in alienation cases. Inpatient treatment may be clinically unfeasible, or the court will not order it. Successful intervention demands the following. The professional must know how to gain the cooperation of the court. Next, the professional must know the specific powers to request of the court. The professional must understand the politics of dealing with nonlocal courts, where he or she may not be a recognized expert. The professional must possess a vast toolbox of nontraditional therapies unique and specific to estrangement.
2006 Parental alienation, the 730 evaluator and the law: an attorney s perspective Gerald Klein JD
psychology CD 10727 Relevant custody law and definitions, the role of the 730 evaluator, the dynamics of parental alienation in high conflict custody cases, the elements of parental alienation, case studies and practical issues will be discussed. This presentation should increase the participant s ability to identify and recognize the signs, symptoms, interactions and family dynamics of parental alienation in the context of applicable law; and allow attendees to better understand estrangement, alignment and affinity distinctions. Participants will learn how to tackle the symptoms versus syndrome issue and how the system inherently encourages alienation.
2005 Joint versus sole custody: psychological and legal considerations Mark L Goldstein PhD psychology tape 3173 Custody evaluators are often called upon to render opinions regarding the issue of joint versus sole legal custody. Often different judicial districts and judges have variable guidelines, adding to the difficulty for the evaluator. This presentation will delineate factors to be considered, particularly in cases involving parental alienation and high conflict. In addition, legal factors from a judge s perspective will be presented. This presentation will familiarize participants with guidelines in these types of cases; familiarize participants with significant legal decisions; and help participants understand the legal and psychological factors in joint vs. sole custody cases.
2005 View of child assessments in custody disputes Allan B. Posthuma, PhD
psychology tape 3176 Dr. Posthuma will review the limited literature on the problems and suggested procedures for the assessment of children in contested custody disputes. Courts are increasingly demanding such assessments but our standard reference texts and professional guidelines do not support this type of intervention. Attendees will learn of the limits of views of child assessments; how to conduct such assessments and how psychological testing can be of assistance
2005 Use of collateral information in child custody assessments Michael F. Elterman, PhD psychology tape 3177 Child custody cases are characterized by biased and false information. The literature and professional guidelines recommend that the psychologist use collateral information to check for accuracy and validity of claims made. Collecting such information is essential to evaluate hypotheses. The presentation will address how this approach is at the root of a scientific approach to custody evaluations. Participants will understand types of collateral information; learn the weight to give certain types of information and what collateral information is essential vs. peripheral in the process.
2005 Spectrum of parental alienation syndrome Deirdre Rand PhD psychology journal 8021 The Parental Alienation Syndrome, so named by Dr. Richard Gardner, is a distinctive family response to divorce in which the child becomes aligned with one parent and preoccupied with unjustified and/or exaggerated denigration of the other, target parent. In severe cases, the child s once love-bonded relationship with rejected/target parent is destroyed. Testimony on Parental Alienation Syndrome (PAS) in legal proceedings has sparked debate. This two-part article seeks to shed light on the debate by reviewing Gardner s work and that of others on PAS, integrating the concept of PAS with research on high conflict divorce and other related literature. The material is organized under topic headings such as parents who induce alienation, the child in PAS, the target/alienated parent, attorneys on PAS, and evaluation and intervention. Part II begins with the child in PAS. Case vignettes of moderate to severe PAS are presented in both parts, some of which illustrate the consequences for children and families when the system is successfully manipulated by the alienating parent, as well as some difficult but effective interventions implemented by the author, her husband Randy Rand, Ed.D., and other colleagues.
2005 Psychological functioning of alienated children in custody disputing families: an exploratory study Janet Johnston PhD psychology journal 9001 In this study of 74 children ages 5-12 years in custody disputes, child alienation was defined as the expression of persistent, strong negative attitudes and rejecting behaviors toward one parent with corresponding emotional enmeshment with the other parent. According to parents' ratings using the Child Behavior Checklist, alienated children had more emotional and behavioral problems of clinically significant proportions compared to their nonalienated counterparts. Personality assessments using the Rorschach suggest that alienated and nonalienated children differ in a number of ways with respect to how they perceive and process information, their preferred coping styles and capacities, and how they express affect. In these domains there were also some unexpected findings. Clinical intervention and social policy implications of the findings within the forensic context are discussed.
2005 Parent alienation strategies: a qualitative study of adults who experienced parental alienation as a child Amy Baker PhD psychology journal 9003 The current study was undertaken to beging to "unpack" the concept of alienation by examining in detail the types ofr actions that alination parents exhibit.
2004 Child custody evaluation pitfalls, including Daubert and relocation issues Keith M. Nelson, JD psychology tape 3080 The do s and don ts in child custody evaluations will be presented. What the courts look for, what lawyers will try to pick apart will be discussed along with Daubert issues on psychological testing. Time will be given to the hottest topic in custody cases: relocation issues and their effects on children. Attendees will learn what to emphasize more in custody evaluations; what psychological tests are most appropriate and useful in custody cases; how to handle relocation issues in evaluations.
2004 Test-assisted detection of the parental alienation syndrome and related clinical scenarios Barry Bricklin, PhD
Elliott G
psychology tape 3086 Studies were conducted to detect test patterns to red-flag not based on actual interactions scenarios, in which what a child is professing verbally to be true is not based on actual interactions with those spoken about, but rather on bribery, intimidation or attempts to save an impaired parent. Sixteen of 23 investigated signs were statistically significant. Attendees will learn: test-assisted ways to detect clinical situations in which what a child is verbally asserting to be true is not based on actual interactions with those spoken about; to distinguish the most reliable and valid ways to accomplish goal; a statistically-validated family observation format.
2004 The three levels of parental alienation syndrome alienators: differential diagnosis and management Richard Gardner MD psychiatry journal 1080 There has been general acceptance in both the legal and mental health literature of the three levels of parental alienation syndrome (PAS) children. There has also been general recognition that the three levels refer to the degree to which the children have become alienated. However, the degree to which alienating parents have indoctrinated the children has not generally been specifically quantified. The purpose of this article is to provide criteria for dividing alienating parents into similar levels, namely, mild, moderate, and severe. Just as the delineation of the children s levels is important if evaluators are to make proper recommendations to courts with regard to therapy and custodial placement, a similar differentiation among alienating parents can be similarly useful, if not crucial.
2003
Judiciary's role in the etiology, symptom development and treatment of the parental alienation syndrome (PAS) Richard Gardner MD psychology journal 8197 no abstracts
2003 The emotional quotient in child custody evaluations Michael F. Elterman, PhD psychology tape 3041 The EQ measure developed by Bar-On has been used for years in industrial psychology. The presenter will review the literature and explain how it may be an important construct in assessing parental capacity. Future use of the instrument in child custody assessments will be discussed.
2003 Parental alienation syndrome - reformulations for the new millennium EJ Hyman PhD psychology tape 3044 The history of parental alienation syndrome, Gardner s initial formulation, subsequent contributions, critiques and recent reformulations of the syndrome will be reviewed. A synthesis of the data to date, ethical considerations, and suggestions for psychometric analysis of the factors will also be offered.
2002 Therapeutic jurisprudence and collaborative representation in high conflict custody cases Leslie D Star PhD psychology tape 2057 The therapeutic jurisprudence/collaborative representation model, concentrating on its relevance to psychologists working in child custody, will be presented. Topics to be covered include the psychology of lawyers, professional responsibility, creative problem solving and a discussion of whether this paradigm can bring about meaningful reform. Presenters represent a multidisciplinary group from psychology, social work and law, who work in the area of matrimonial law and forensic behavioral health, and will discuss the impact of this model on their areas of practice. Participants will: understand the principles of therapeutic jurisprudence and collaborative representation; apply these principles to the resolution of high conflict custody cases; determine which cases would be appropriate for such intervention; understand possible ethical, boundary and role conflicts in conjoint decision making.
2002 Child custody evaluations: What can empirical data from 4,500 cases tell us? Barry Bricklin, PhD
Gail Elliot, PhD
psychology tape 2013 In upgrading the norms, reliability and validity of two tests on 4,500 cases, including 200 retest cases, the authors found the data addressed many areas helpful to custody evaluators in general, regardless of whether they use tests. The data identify what kinds of information are most likely to: arise from accurate sources; predict unstable family systems; differentiate errors versus true changes in assessed variables; suggest when one should ask a child direct, possibly guilt-inducing questions; predict when joint custody will probably work. Attendees will: 1) learn about empirical data that exist on 4,500 cases; 2) learn to formulate relevant, finely-tuned clinical hypotheses to consider in doing custody evaluations; 3) learn which information sources tend to be most accurate and lead to more stable-over-time conclusions.

2002 Misdiagnosis of parental alienation syndrome Richard Warshak PhD psychology journal 5421 The term parental alienation syndrome (PAS) continues to stir controversy in part because of a concern that during custody litigation the term is applied indiscriminately to children who reject a parent regardless of the type of rejection or the reasons for it. This article describes and illustrates three general categories of situations that superficially resemble PAS and can be mistaken for it. First are children who are not truly alienated but who nonetheless resist spending time with a parent or exhibit hostility toward a parent. Second are children who resist becoming alienated despite one parent s denigration of the other. The third category consists of children who are truly alienated, but whose alienation is not caused primarily by the favored parent s influence.
2001 Knowledge base and specific procedures needed in high conflict child custody cases
Barry Bricklin, PhD psychology tape 1025 The parent who seeks to destroy the other parent regardless of harm to the child, and who is expert at seducing na´ve mental health professionals and elements of the legal system into joining the cause, is on the rise. Standard techniques (individual or family therapy) do not work in these cases; they actually make everything worse. Seventeen items necessary to achieve resolution in high conflict cases will be detailed. These include crucial research knowledge as well as very specific clinical methods. Attendees will understand the complexities of high conflict cases; critical empirical research; and the specific techniques needed, e.g., discerning relevant opinions, special diagnostics and therapies, needed assistance of the judiciary, and how to elicit information from children in ways that avoid loyalty conflicts.
2001 Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III- the normal quartet in child custody cases Robert Halon PhD psychology journal 166 Professionals intervening in child custody cases quickly wonder what makes some parents so recalcitrant that custody of their children must be decided by strangers through expensive child custody evaluations and contentious court trials. This article will explain why interpretation of defined profiles is highly problematic and why they might not be what they seem.
2001 Current controversies regarding parental alienation syndrome Richard Warshak PhD psychology journal 1075 Despite a growing literature, the term parental alienation syndrome (PAS) continues to stir controversy in child custody matters. This article draws on the relevant literature to examine the main controversies surrounding the use of the term PAS by mental health professionals. The focus is on controversies regarding the conceptualization of the problem of alienated children, the reliability and validity of PAS, and the treatment of PAS. Some attention is given to issues relevant to the admissibility of expert testimony on PAS, such as the use of the term "syndrome," the question of whether PAS has passed peer review, and whether PAS enjoys general acceptance in the relevant professional community
2001 Child custody and research literature John W. Kelsey, PhD psychology tape 1501 no abstract
2000 Custody cases and protection of children and parents in therapy Carol Selin PhD psychology tape 1004
no abstracts
1999 Substance abuse in child custody George S. Glass, MD
psychiatry tapes 1141 Substance abuse is often injected into the midst of a custody battle. It is essential to obtain an accurate assessment of the individual accused of substance abuse to determine if the children are being endangered, or if the accusation is a manipulation on the part of the other spouse to limit access to the children. The author will clarify what should be involved in a forensic substance abuse assessment, including what the tests show and what corroborating information is necessary. If an abuse problem does exist, what can be done to ensure than an individual will comply with the treatment recommendations? How can an individual who has a problem be monitored to protect the children? These issues will be addressed.

1999 Use of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory in evaluating child custody litigants Anita Lampel PhD psychology journal 149 Fifty divorcing couples litigating over custody of their children completed the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III as part of a court ordered psychological evaluation. Results for the four validity scales and the 11 basic personality scales of the MCMI-III were then assessed for gender distribution and relationship to presenting problems. Litigants were defensive. The majority of litigants elevated on one of three scales: obsessive-compulsive, histrionic, and narcissistic. Men were more likely to elevate on single scales while women were more likely to elevate on combinations of scales. Women were more likely to test with histrionic features as some component of their personality structures as assessed on the test. Further discussion.
1999 In pursuit of meeting the best interest of the child-a phase related intervention model Frank Leek PhD, Douglas Liebert psychology journal 150 This article proposes that there are a number of identifiable and predictable developmental stages inherent in the dissolution of most family relationships that include children. The authors identify those stages commonly found within the context of the judicial system, and describe a multilevel intervention model or framework available to professionals in their efforts to offer effective assistance to the family.
1999 Minimalist approach to child custody evaluation Jon Amundson PhD psychology journal 1123 Child custody evaluation poses particular challenges for the forensic psychologist. Perhaps nowhere else are clinical boundaries so blurred and issues at law so easily confused with psychological provenance. Psychologists regularly err on the side of over-involvement in custody cases. A "minimalist" approach is outlined which emphasizes not only ethics and current practice guidelines but promises to: 1) utilize the knowledge base and particular skills associated with the discipline, and 2) provide more focused support or input for the parties involved.
1999 Minimalist approach to child custody evaluation Jon Amundson PhD psychology tape 9077 Child custody evaluation poses particular challenges for the forensic psychologist. Perhaps nowhere else are clinical boundaries so blurred and issues at law so easily confused with psychological provenance. Psychologists regularly err on the side of over-involvement in custody cases. A "minimalist" approach is outlined which emphasizes not only ethics and current practice guidelines but promises to: 1) utilize the knowledge base and particular skills associated with the discipline, and 2) provide more focused support or input for the parties involved.
1998 Resolving child access problems Michael F. Elterman, PhD psychology tape 1086 Resolving child access problems is one of the most difficult challenges facing forensic psychologists. Often the outcome determines whether a child or children will have a relationship with one of their parents. The presentation will describe a number of different types of access problems, including access denial, parental alienation, and false allegations.
1998 The alienated child Nancy van Couvering PhD psychology tape 1228 The first part of this presentation will review and update the different ways child alienation has been conceptualized, with a focus on clarifying where the center of the process is seen to lien the child, the alienated parent, or the alienating parent, or whether this is seen as a tripartite "syndrome." Next will be a discussion of the sources of alienation. Alienation will be described in the context of relevant developmental, social, and personality factors. Identifying features of the alienated child and the practical need for changing the focus from "parental alienation" to "alienated child" will be presented. Judicial interventions and legal consequences of alienation will be discussed.
1998 Creative decision-making in custody arrangements-new avenues of thought Mike McCurley JD psychology tape 1203 So many of the courts "rubber stamp" custody arrangements, which more than likely have to be renegotiated in the judicial system. There have been movements by fathers groups across the country to change the approach to custody, a departure from the tender years philosophy. Try as they may, the courts have yet to define custody arrangements that are in the "best interests of children." In most cases, the custody arrangement is made by the more influential attorney representing one parent. There are judges who show themselves to be creative in their decision making but, unfortunately, the result often ends in another court appearance. New avenues of thinking about custody arrangements for children will be addressed.
1997 Does parental alienation exist? Preliminary empirical study of the phenomenon Larry Nicholas, PhD psychology tape 1275 The study provides evidence of parental alienation being a syndrome which has aspects that affect the child and both parents. The preliminary nature of this study points to numerous limitations which will be discussed along with directions for further research.
1997 Ethical and forensic issues sexual orientation and child custody James E Stark PhD psychology tape 10125 This presentation will include a review of research relative to sexual orientation, parenting issues, and legal determinations. Legal arguments for and against lesbian and gay custody of minor children will be explored as well as ethical issues from a psychological and legal perspective. Special attention will be focused on myths concerning lesbians and gays. Participants will also learn to appreciate the legal struggles of lesbian and gay parents concerning custody of their children.
1997 Who gets to move the children? the challenges of mobility or move away cases Larry S. Fong, PhD
psychology tape 1245 Across Canada and the United States there are a number of cases that dictate whether children can move with one parent or must stay with the residing parent. What do these cases say that guide the assessor with making good decisions? Insights related to forensic practice.
1997 Parental Alienation Syndrome Rosemary Bower PhD psychology tape 1236 no abstract
1997 Spectrum of parental alienation syndrome Deirdre Rand PhD psychology journal 5263 no abstract
1996 Single parent child custody evaluations- technical and ethical issues Steven Klee, PhD psychology tape 1423 Psychologists are often asked to conduct child custody evaluations when only one parent is available for examination. The question arises as to whether such evaluations should be attempted and, if so, what are the limitations of the findings. The present paper, using numerous case examples, will argue that one parent evaluations can provide useful information to the courts as long as the findings and conclusions are discussed within the context of strengths and weaknesses of the parent examined without extensive comparisons between parents. Participants will learn about general issues involved in conducting a custody evaluation and specific difficulties and limitations involving single parent assessments will be explored.
1996 Sexual orientation issues in child custody and visitation disputes James E Stark PhD psychology tape 1472 This presentation will include a review of research relative to sexual orientation and parenting issues. Relevant research comparing gay, lesbian, bisexual and heterosexual parenting of children will be presented. In view of the intense confusion in society (including that of judges, juries and attorneys), special attention will be paid to research, clinical and experiential data concerning myths of recruitment of children into a "gay and lesbian lifestyle," development of homosexuality (for instance, choice versus non choice issues), concern about the sexual abuse of children by heterosexuals and homosexuals and concern about advocacy for "special rights."
1996 Culture and child custody decisions- case studies in forensic psychology Richard V Campagna JD psychology tape 1445 This presentation will focus on ways in which issues of culture have an impact on child custody decisions. It will also explore ways in which the forensic psychologist may render expert opinion. Kleist v. Mendez, a bitterly contested landmark child custody case, was recently decided by the Iowa Supreme Court. The case and its issues of culture and parental rights will be viewed from three different perspectives: legal, psychological and maternal. The mother in the case, will be present to discuss the case.
1996 Survey of psychologists' safety issues and concerns Billie Corder EdD
psychology journal 569 Areas of practice which appeared to present most dangerous situations for survey respondents were conflicts over results in child custody, commitment or occupationally related evaluations, and in highly conflicted marital therapy or related evaluations involving divorce or separation. Most of these evaluations were part of legal procedures. Male patients or male spouses of patients with military service or law enforcement backgrounds and history of acting out behaviors appeared to be associated with high risk for threatening behavior toward therapists when involved in these types of situations.
1995 Lies my father may have told me; Is parental alienation syndrome a useful concept? Steven Klee, PhD psychology tape 1463 no abstract
1994 Legal and psychological aspects of the adoption process Richard V. Campagna, JD psychology tape 10098 Major legal and psychological aspects of the adoption process are discussed. The psychological dimension includes infertility guilt, feelings of abandonment by the adoptive child, relationships between siblings, multicultural issues, and genetics.
1994 Child custody "Move Away" cases- McGinnis and psychology Robert Halon PhD psychology journal 6090 The California Appellate Court is currently addressing new legal issues which have been generated by child custody "move away" cases. These cases have emphasized the need for independent custody evaluators to look with extreme care at the dynamic factors which will shape the lives of the family members by rearrangement of existing family structure and interrelationships. The legal issues appear to center around the conditions that must be met by the trial court before that court may exercise sound discretion in deciding these cases. The psychological issues center around the adequate identification (and examination) of key factors, from among a potentially vast array of factors, which are considered by the evaluator necessary for the trial court to consider.
1993 Sexual abuse in child custody cases Steven Klee, PhD psychology tape 10014 The issue of sexual abuse charges that arise during divorce and custody procedures is addressed. Drawing from case material, this issue will be examined from both a legal and psychological perspective. Topics discussed include reasons for such allegations, how to assess the truth and the nature of the lawyer psychologist interaction in such cases. The ethical dilemmas that confront professionals will also be examined. Participants will gain knowledge regarding the dynamics that contribute to sexual abuse allegations in custody disputes. They will also learn how to effectively collaborate with lawyers in such cases.


1993 Evaluator countertransference in the context of child custody evaluations Michael Freedman PhD,
Samuel Rosenberg PhD
psychology journal 5092 Child custody evaluators experience a broad range of thoughts and feelings towards the adults and children they evaluate. If left unrecognized, these countertransference reactions may inadvertently bias the evaluators, resulting in distorted perceptions of the clients and inappropriate recommendations regarding the child's bests interests. Case examples are provided to illustrate the impact of countertransference reactions upon child custody evaluations
1991 Evaluating allegations of child sexual abuse in custody disputes Michael F. Elterman, PhD psychology tape 1922 The incidence of sexual abuse allegations in custody disputes has risen dramatically. The author has seen over 200 cases in his private practice referred by the courts and proposes a set of dimensions by which to differentiate probable and improbable cases.
1990 The comprehensive child custody evaluation - model for forensic professionals Robert Halon PhD psychology journal 5113 A comprehensive child custody evaluation model for use by forensic mental health professionals is introduced by psychologist who has performed hundreds of custody evaluations.
1990 Comprehensive child custody evaluation Robert Halon PhD psychology journal 8144 no abstract
1990 Comprehensive child custody evaluation Robert Halon PhD psychology tape 1764 A comprehensive child custody evaluation model for use by forensic mental health professionals will be introduced by the speaker who has performed hundreds of custody evaluations.
1989 The child custody evaluation- legal standards and psychological data James H. Papen, PhD
psychology tape 1496 Speaker discusses statutes and case law surrounding child custody determinations and the integration of psychological data in formulating an opinion for the court regarding custody.